Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Simmy

Linking Barometric Pressure And How We Feel

Recommended Posts

Only problem is, I haven't found a way to control barometric pressure yet. LOL :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.healthhol...rg/neg-ions.htm

Positive ions or the lack of negative ions may cause serotonin hyperfunction syndrome or "irritation syndrome" involves sleeplessness, irritability, tension, migraine, nausea, heart palpitations, hot flashes with sweating or chills, tremor and dizziness. The elderly become depressed, apathetic and extremely fatigued.

LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shift in barometric pressure that aggravates symptoms would certainly make sense if the Driscoll theory is accurate. People who have a brain tumor, or have had brain surgery with shunts are highly affected by barometric pressure changes due to their inability to regulate CSF correctly. I actually have a watch that gives the barometric pressure--it does seem to correlate mildly with my symptoms.

As for me, I notice the biggest increase in my symptoms with changes in altitude. I am best at sea level. It's such a dramatic difference that even traveling by car can be difficult. I took one trip that was non-stop hills and valleys--every time we would go up the huge hill my head would kill me and I would feel very dizzy,...relief only came at the bottom of the hill. It really impressed upon me that the pressures in my head cannot be right :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i live below sea level and have trouble changing altitudes as well. when above 800 meters (while traveling by car) i get severe chest pain and need to be supine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.healthhol...rg/neg-ions.htm

Positive ions or the lack of negative ions may cause serotonin hyperfunction syndrome or "irritation syndrome" involves sleeplessness, irritability, tension, migraine, nausea, heart palpitations, hot flashes with sweating or chills, tremor and dizziness. The elderly become depressed, apathetic and extremely fatigued.

LOL

Believe it or not - the claims for those salt lights are supposed to put good ions in the air. Maybe, we need to go out and all get us one?????? That sounds like all the symptoms of POTS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rissy,

I'm the same way - even a little hike in elevation causes me extreme problems - naseau, headaches, stopped up ears. I used to live at 7,000 feet in Colorado. I NEVER adjusted to it and lived there for 26 years. Finally, we moved lower down to AZ and I feel sooooo much better here. I always dread going back up to Colorado - but at the same time want to - but, I know I'm not going to feel good there and I also have to use oxygen there. My body just won't regulate itself.

Rama, I'm one of those with the arthritis and miagraines and you are so right.

Issie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If i had major changes with altitude I would look seriously at nitric oxide.

Yeah, pretty sure mine is low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I definitely feel worse before and during some/most storms. I live at 6035ft above sea level, at the foot of The Rocky Mountains in CO. I have only recently began (begun?) to correlate the storms with increased symptoms, such as: head pressure, sinus 'pain', chest tightness, joint pain, fatigue, etc. I will be having a few good days in a row, where I think that things are getting better and that I may be beating this thing called POTS - and then I will wake up one day and everything is back and sure enough, there is a storm either building up over the mountains or already over my house. Et voila, when the storm has fully passed over my house and I can see it's end out East, that is around the time I start to feel better. It happened just today and last Wednesday and...

I checked Julie's link for altitude air pressure and it says that a normal day for my altitude is 616 mmHg. The conversion tables I found in a quick search don't even go that low, but for 675, it is 26.57, so mine is lower than that. It also said there is only 81% oxygen available here, as compared to sea level, nice! I guess I am used to it though. The only time I notice trouble breathing is when I am returning home from an airline trip to a much-lower-elevation locale. Or when I used to hike in the mountains and would get ridiculously out-of-breath right away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW... I am feeling like I am jumping in VERY late to this discussion!!!! Back in 2008 I had an "episode" of Cluster Headaches- not sure if all of you are familair with them, but they are different kind of headache. Here is a description of them via a web link from Mayo http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cluster-headache/DS00487 . I have to say, I have NEVER experienced anything like this. They would get so bad (and I am embarrassed to even admit this but I would actualy grab whatever what closest to me and beat myself over the head with it- just to re-locate the pain). I also started having some syncope during this period and had 3 concussions during the time period that the cluster period lasted (4 very long months). Like most things with the brain, they are poorly understood and occur most commonly in men so once again, I was an enigma :) Went through lots of tests, but my autoimmune or autonomic issues were never discovered during this. These headaches were so strange because I could time them by the minute. I would get about 8 a day- and they would happen the SAME time every day. There seems to be a link to barometric pressure, altitude, and oddly, the soltices with these clusters. I feel so blessed that I only endured them for four months and still have not (knock wood and Praise God) that they NEVER come back. Some people have them chronically and they never go away. The intensity of the pain is just beyond description. I get migraines, I get bad headaches, but this is like an ice pick stabbing you in the eye repeatedly. Mine would last 15 to 30 minutes. Now, I guess they've found just pure oxygen is remarkably helpful in treatment of the headaches but 4 years ago it wasn't widely known I guess. When I was diagnosed, the neurologist told me he calls them "Suicide Headaches" because in 30 something years of practice (he specializes in headaches so I am sure he saw many people with these) he said he had lost 3 patients to suicide that he fully believes is attributed to the pain- all three had the chronic kind- no remission. Such a nightmare.

My normal migraines, headaches, or post concussion headaches are often connected to barometric pressure. I also get a LOT of joint pain with the barometric pressure is changing. My left knee has undergone complete reconstruction and is a MESS and a half and the pain in that knee (which is bone on bone at this point) when the pressure changes is almost unbearable. So there has got to be something to this. Question.... WHAT on earth do we do about it????? ^_^ Hmmmmm..

Jen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a good set of Q&A about barometric pressure and headaches. There are 3 questions about it, all towards the bottom:

http://www.usatoday.com/weather/resources/askjack/wabiomet.htm

(I hope the pasted link works, this is my first link pasting using an iPad)

It is interesting that today, we are having a crazy wind storm that looks like it will bring rain soon, but my headache is only mild compared to the one from yesterday, which was a very wimpy storm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is one more interesting article that talks about air pressure and the inner workings of the head. It is referring to air travel, but it is relevant, I think. I tried holding my nose and forcing air outward, the way you do to 'pop' your ears, during a storm today and it did give me a few minutes of relief from the headache. Gum helped a little bit, too. I couldn't force a yawn. I'd like to see more info about barometric pressure and our blood flow, etc, but at least this stuff might explain the headaches.

http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF13/1308.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get lightheaded and just disoriented when it rains. Today I feel so out of it like im in a fog and like im in a dream and can't wake up. I am exhausted as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Debilitated for years now and all the symptoms of POTS but no formal diagnosis... the last 2 days it has been over 90 here in Oregon.  Yesterday was over 95... and I went outside and spread bark dust.  I mean... I still sat most the time, but I walked across the yard several times and did an entire load of dishes all at once... and today the temp went down by about 15 degrees, and I am back in bed, stuck.  I feel like Cinderella after the ball.  😢🤷🏼‍♀️

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Rachel Ann - sorry about that!!! I know what it is like but here is what I have learned: IF I am having a good day I still only do what I do every day, I do no longer feel that if I am feeling up to it I could do heavy work. I developed a routine of doing chores and resting inbetween that works good for me and I follow it regardless of how good I feel. That prevents me from burning out, like you describe. Having said that - I also do mild exercises every day, good or bad. Most recently I am using a rowing machine, which is excellent exercise for someone with orthostatic intolerance. I do what I can twice a day and when I am unwell I do it once a day. That keeps me within my routine and prevents me from overdoing it - or underdoing it, which causes debility and makes OI worse. 

And yes - heat WILL drain the sap right out of me, on hot and humid days I stay inside or only go out early in the morning or in the evening, when it cools down. If I have to do work like you describe I do not so the dishes after - I don't care if they sit, or I ask my family to do them. I hope you recover soon!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with @Pistol I try not to overdo anything on the good days even though it’s really hard.  When it gets hot and humid here (Great Lakes) I have to increase salt and fluids and not go outside if it’s >83 or so.  The humidity is harder on me than the heat.  I definitely take it easy on those days and only go out early or late if at all.  While those are the worst days to wear compression stockings they do help.  I hope you recover quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...