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[Lost my post again.... Have been diagnosed with "metabolic syndrom" or syndrome X. My blood sugars are 100-125, cholesterol off charts. HDL 61............. My waist has been growing despite food control and exercise. Any other pots folks have this?

Edited by Miriam Poorman-Knox
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I've never heard of "syndrome x" before. Do you have any links to share with info?

Personally, I have had high cholesterol since my youth--it's never been lower than 375, and currently is over 400. I've been told by a lipid specialist that I have "good ratio" of hdl to ldl, so he didn't want to put me on anything to treat it. Basically he said that my high hdl was so good that it should counteract the ldl... but my triglycerides were typically not elevated.

Nina

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it doesn't use the "syndrome x" phraseology but here's a link to metabolic syndrome which seems to fit the description: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4756

and here's a link to a bunch of info: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/metabolicsyndromex.html

:D melissa

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Thanks Melissa--I can see from the diagnostic criteria that low hdl is part of the syndrome along with obesity and isulin resistance. Interesting reading.

nina

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Syndrome X is just another phrase for a pre-diabetic state. The best way to treat it before it turns into diabetes is to carefully evaluate your diet. Eliminate sugars, refined carbs, white breads, sweets, pastries, etc. Include more fiber in yor diet as well.

Changing eating habits to those of primarily low to moderate glycemic index foods normally turns this pre-diabetic state around for most people. Meds aren't normally required.

Gena

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Hi Gena. I don't understand the Pre-diabetic state. I am insulin dependant and the endo just gave me that label along with tsh t3 and t4 abnormalities and some kind of adrenal mass. I am also interested in more of a holistic way of living and taking control of my illness any suggestions?

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Hi Lynda,

If you are already insulin dependent, then maybe your doctor was referring to the other cardiovascular risk factors involved in this syndrome?? It's well known that if you have diabetes, that this increases risk for heart disease and/or stroke. However, careful management of it through food and lifestyle changes can reduce this risk.

Here is an excerpt from the American Heart Association's website on metabolic syndrome...

AHA Recommendation for Managing the Metabolic Syndrome:

The primary goal of clinical management of the metabolic syndrome is to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Then, the first-line therapy is to reduce the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease: stop smoking and reduce LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels to the recommended levels.

For managing both long- and short-term risk, lifestyle therapies are the first-line interventions to reduce the metabolic risk factors. These lifestyle interventions include:

Weight loss to achieve a desirable weight (BMI less than 25 kg/m2)

Increased physical activity, with a goal of at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week

Healthy feating habits that include reduced intake of saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol

My mom was dx'd with this too. Basically the doc said to her "you are showing insulin resistance and you are overweight. You need to correct this by changing your eating habits and losing weight before it turns into type 2 diabetes and/or heart problems."

Hope this helps! :D

Gena

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I have already done all the correct diet stuff. Still couldn't lose weight' a sign of this. My doctor put me on a statin instead of gemfibrozil. Next she will try meridia for a short time, to see if we can stop the cycle. She has contacted my endo from mayo and he is working with her. Miriam :D

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Hi,

I've noticed that my fasting blood sugar is also increasing (about 110 now), my weight has increased, as has my waist line. And I'm having a great deal of trouble losing the extra 20 lbs. I have. I am pretty sedentary (although I still try to exercise most days).

When I first got POTS, I gained a few pounds, then suddenly lost about 15, then regained another 20-25. And this was just over a few months time!

Do you think the POTS has affected you in this way? Blood sugar metabolism IS an autonomic function, and I did suffer with the "rebound hypoglycemia" typical of pots. It wouldn't surprise me at all to find out that POTS is a factor...

Diana

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Guest Julia59

I think with POTS many of us find it very difficult to get any aerobic exercise. My BP has been running 70s/50s standing---this is in the AM---not sure how it is in the evening. I have to crawl up my basement steps-------and I have a difficult time just getting myself dressed---or bathing/showering. not to mention the physical pain a lot of us suffer from. My upper spine issues can really beat me down some days---and combined with the low BP---i'm pretty useless. I just think it's a little more complicated then getting more exercise and eating right.

Many of the medications we are put on can make us gain weight---mid belly. I never struggled with weight until my POTS hit---and I was put on wellbutrin. The propranolol took my weight from the 120s to the 140s---and I stayed that way for years. Still the 140s weren't bad at 5ft. 4in----I could wear a size 10 comfortably. Then I lost weight in the beginning of POTS---down to 124---size 6.

I carry my weight well, so I don't really look my weight. But after we got the hyper adrengic spells controlled---I gained all my weight back ---plus 10 more pounds---size 12. My HDL cholesterol has always been low---and my totals have run from 180 to 205 at the highest. My HDL has run 37 to as low as 25. My HDL was 25 when I weighed 119 pounds! I was 31 years old, and stayed below 140 until I turned 40. I had to go on propranolol when I was 31---and that is when my weight shot up to about 139. Then I walked a lot, used a stair stepper and hovered around 130. I still exercised up until about 6 months before my POTS crashed.

It may be that some of us with POTs are more prone to syndrome X-----as our body has been ----well, basically run through the mill. My weight is gained through the middle also. since my hyper adrengic stuff is back---i'm losing weight again, but i'm trying to eat well as I don't want to lose it rapidly.

I can't imagine trying to do aerobic exercise with LOW BLOOD PRESSURE---it's difficult enough to sit up---or walk. I can't tolerate statins----and niacin is not a good choice for people with POTS, as it is a vasodilator. so now I try omega-3. My diet was so low in fats that I didn't get the good fats, so hopefully this will work to raise the HDL. (My total now is 195)--LDL 126---HDL 27-----tryclicerides---205. I know the tryglicerides are high---but it's down from 260. I cut down on simple sugars. Mind you---I didn't eat a lot the refined carbs anyway---but I still found room to cut back.

I use what ever energy I have to take care of my home---there is nothing left after that. It's hard to believe that I once worked full time, went to school, walked up to 5 miles at a time---and took care of my home.

I just think it's a lot more difficult for many with physical limitations to avoid getting a little thicker around the middle. It can be so depressing to have times where your housebound---or very limited on getting out----then be told---"your and APPLE!" by you nurse practioner who has no clue how I got there---and furthermore----I would hardly call a size 12 an apple----maybe a cucumber---but certainly not an apple. I was insulted and found a gynochologist who actually saw me for me. I did not want to be seen by some apathetic NP. Not to say all NP are that way---I saw a real nice one years ago in my gynos office, but the Doc went into teaching and I lost him and his NP---she was great. If it wasn't for her I would have never known I had hashemotos thyroid disease.

And thyroid disease alone can cause quite a mess with your metabolic system.

Although I get a fair amount of exercise taking care of my house---I am determined to get on the bike, and use my leg weights again. Even when I walked 5 miles a day my HDL was still low.

Miriam, I understand your frustration completely----I also eat a good diet for the most part---although I need to increase veggies and fruit----but yet I still struggle with my numbers. My glucose has been stable---and I obviously don't have a high blood pressure issue.

It's a shame---some of us really have the cards stacked against us---but yet we troop along and try anyway.

I found weightwatchers to be a helpful diet to stand by ----as your allowed to be human. Basically, it shows you how much food your really missing----that's how I found out I need MORE fruits and veggies. I tend to be guarded in that area as my diverticulitis in my small bowel flairs up with certain fruit skins and seeds ect---now I just find those that I can tolerate.

Julie :0)

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You are right. Ironically on CNN yesterday there was a story about metabolic syndrome. It emphasized that it increases risk for stroke, cardiac arrest, liver problems and diabetes but there were others. I am anxious to hear what my doc from Mayo said to my PCP. Will pass on . Thanks Miriam

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When they say that syndrome X is "prediabetes," they mean insulin resistance. Type II diabetics make insulin, but their bodies don't use it properly. If you already have type I diabetes (because your body doesn't make insulin), you still have to worry about insulin resistance.

If you have syndrome X, talk to a nutritionist. From what I understand, the current thinking is not to avoid carbohydrates per se, but to avoid "quick release" carbohydrates, such as white bread and potatoes. They make your blood sugar go up rapidly. The glycemic index is a measure of how fast the carbs from a particular food will hit your bloodstream. The glycemic load takes into account how much carbohydrate a food has, as well as how quickly it is released. Something with a little bit of glucose in it might have a high glycemic index but a low glycemic load. Fiber and fat slow down the rate at which the sugar hits your bloodstream. So if you eat a high-fiber multigrain bread with some olive oil, you'd get much less damage from the same amount of carbs.

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Iam so glad to have caught this topic. Since being diagnosed may 2005 with POTS and all the orthostatic hypotension stuff my body has really been giving me fits. No matter how little I eat I seem to be gaining weight. I had a baby in Feb 2005 after gaining 36lbs, I lost fro 186 to 156 and was holding prttey steady till August 2005. Then I noticed one week I would be 150 then the next 159 and thhis continued till December 05. Now I am at 165 and have been wathching mt caolories and increasing my fruits and still my weight is out of control. I seem to be gaining weight. After hearing that I am not imagining this I am gooiing to make another appt with my doctor to see if he will help me work through this and get back in control. I added ankle weights and have started riding my stationary bike 5 days a week and I am up to 25 min at a time. I just feel so hopeless. thanks for listening! Keep the info coming

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