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Heart Rate Watches


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Has anyone found a heart rate watch that doesn't look like it came out of a bubble-gum machine? I went shopping for one recently and was quite disappointed with the ones available in some of the sports stores. Any suggestions?

Michelle

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For me, I only want to check my pulse, now and then and I don't need the type of constant monitoring that expensive watches with chest straps provide. So I settled on a small device that I can put my finger on and take a quick look at what is going on. The model I purchased was from Tanita and was less than $25.

http://www.tanita-scale.com/cardio.html

Good luck with your research,

EM

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Guest tearose

I only wish some company made the watch look nice! I use the polar brand and it is rubbery-plastic-big and black. I recently considered getting a new $35 heart rate monitor from WalMart and using beads and glue to make something for "special occasions". lol It would have been a disaster! Anyway, since my monitor is used continously to treat my POTS I am stuck with the ugly version until someone makes an attractive watch! I still am considering replacing the watch band at least which is something you could do too. It is easier to find colorful watch bands than to find a stylish monitor watch. Please let me know if you find something better looking out there as you search! Best regards, tearose

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Mine is by SmartTrak and it's hideous. I've not seen any that look much better. Nina

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I have had exactly the same problem, it is so very disappointing... ;)

Somewhere must sell a sports watch that is more feminine, so far everything I have found is just so masculine. I had thought of purchasing a watch with a small face, and then replacing the watch strap with a pretty or unusual strap, with the intention of trying to keep the face of the watch out of view.

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When I exercise, I need to monitor my HR so that 1) I work hard enough to stay within target range and 2) if I go too high, slow down, or do whatever I need to do in order to stay safe.

I guess we're all quite different--monitoring my HR doesn't make me upset or depressed at all.

Michelle, of the watches I've looked at, Mio makes the most streamlined. It's more of a sports oriented watch--certainly not an everyday wearing kind of thing--but not as ugly/clunky as others. In particular, they have a model that's all silvertone, including the band. It also comes with an extra band that's black, but I think the silver looks nicer.

If anyone finds one that's more feminine, do let us know!

Nina :D

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for me monitoring my HR is more of a precaution than anything also I can tell my Dr what triggers I have. My Hr goes dramatically up before my BP begins to drop so watching it helps me to avoid the severe nausea that comes with my low BP. I've only had POTS for 2 years now and still trying to learn my "new" body .Managing my symptoms without completely relying on med. (that doesnt cure it anyway) is important to me , this forum has been a great tool for that because I have learned alot about food to avoid and exercises to help. I'll accept any advice you guys can give! Hopefully I'll get familiar enough with my body's warning signs to not need the monitors any more but for now I still seem to blow it off as something else-like I'm just hungry or maybe I'm getting a cold,you know the typical responses. :rolleyes: I'm stubborn so I still fight the symptoms and tend to push too far....I'm learning (the hard way ) :D

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Guest tearose

Maybe we should design our own watch and market it! The DINET monitor!

Dear goldicedance: to answer your question about constant heart rate monitoring... It is never a source of depression for me. In fact it has freed me from wondering where my heart rate is at any particular time. I have the high alarm set for 140 so when it beeps I know I must soon sit down. Before using it I would get to a point where I would see white spots and nearly pass out. I also had several episodes of a heart rate of 170 triggering an attack of superventricular tachycardia. I really had no idea when my heart rate was 140, 150, 160.... I just got use to the feeling of my fast heart and ignored it. Conversly, my heart rate at times can swing very low and when the alarm beeps below 40, (sometimes as low as 32-38 bpm) it "wakes" me and my heart rate comes backup in response to me "waking up" I use my heart rate monitor and compression garments to "treat"my dysautonomia. I cannot use any medications so I have no other choice! I hope no one feels depressed using a heart rate monitor. I would hope it makes one move on with their life knowing that before they get near a "danger zone" their monitor will beep and corrective action can be made. I hope this helps you understand, thanks for asking, tearose

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Guest Julia

I don't monitor my HR very often, because it scares me if it's too high---even in the 90s---------- :) It's just a psychological thing for me............

I just get more anxious and my HR will go higher. I can tell if my HR is getting high. My POTs is hyper adrengic---and if my HR gets real high it's usually do to an Hyper adrengic attack---and i'll get tremors and all kinds of other fun symptoms.

However, I think it might even be necessary for many on this forum with OI---it's a warning signal to let them know they need to sit---or lay down. If it doesn't make one nervous to see the high HR---then I think it's a great tool to help lessen the amont of times passing out.

I just get in a dither to even see myself monitored. Today I took my BP and my HR was hovering near 100---or just over a 100, and it made me nervous, and that's on a BB. They can do so much these days----e-mail on cell phone's ect.---why oh why can't they make a decent looking heart watch monitor.

Julie :0)

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Julie,

I share your disdain for heart rate monitors, as I, too, get 'wigged out' when I see my rate higher than it should be! Of course, having one helped me prove to my cardiologist (who thought I was having panic attacks) that I was suffering from some sort of hyper beta-adrenergic sensitivity. As a recreational athlete, I had always used the 'percieved exertion' standard in my workouts, until I started noticing heart rate irregularities. I bought a heart rate monitor and was STUNNED to see how my heart rate (on certain days) would SKYROCKET to 150 or 160 within a minute or two of beginning a run! I told my cardiologist about it and requested she do a stress test. Fortunately, my heart was "acting up" that day, and when I stood up for the test, my HR went from 60 or so to over 100. And I hit 140 bmp within two minutes of commencing exercise! (Remember, I'm a marathon runner! It's supposed to take me a long time to hit this level!) Well, I had no trouble completing the five-stage Bruce stress test, but my heart rate reached 196. As I was calmly chugging away on the treadmill, I said, "So, do you think I'm having a panic attack right now?"

She was stumped, but consulted with an electrophysiologist in her practice who was the first to mention Innappropriate Sinus Tachycardia to me. I still don't have an official diagnosis, but I clearly have some elements of IST and POTS. Fortunately, the symptoms wax and wane and I have more good days than bad.

I did inquire as to whether there was any risk with my HR being so high on certain days, and whether I needed to monitor it. The docs assured me I was fine. (This was after an echo and a thorough history had been taken, of course.) I continued to train with the HR monitor for a few months, but realized it was having deleterious effects on me psychologically. So, I finally decided to trust the doctors and ditch the monitor. While I know there's something very physical that drives these symptoms, I do think that fixating on them (at least in my case) can make them worse. So I've gone back to my old "perceived exertion" method of monitoring my workouts!

RunnerGirl

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