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Fainted For The First Time - Had To Be In Public


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I can't believe this. I haven't fainted before. :)

I was at Children's Hospital with two of my children for a follow up visit (nothing bad). I was getting up to leave, and (I don't emember this) I fainted and fell on the nurse practitioner. The next thing I remember is being flat on my back staring up at the bottom of a chair, and all kinds of people talking. From what I gathered, the nurse practitioner screamed for the doctor when I went down, and the doctor knows a little about my condition and monitored my BP and pulse until they could get my husband there to get me and the kids. My BP was high and my pulse would jump to 150 just by me trying to get my legs bent up. The children were terrified and crying. I feel so stupid, and so bad for my children that they had to see that and be so upset.

My husband took me to the (adult) hospital. The hospital wasn't impressed, kept me five hours and gave me a liter of fluids and took a lot of blood. Sent me home at 3 am this morning. Of course by the time I got to the hospital, my BP and pulse had somewhat normalized and my EKG was perfect.

Talked to my doctor's nurse. She wasn't impressed either. Said that is one of the things that happen with POTS. But I've never fainted before... I have to go back to work tomorrow, and now I'm terrified this will happen again.

Angela

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((((((((((((BIG HUGS))))))))))))))

I haven't fainted in nearly seven years, but it was a miserable experience when it happened. I'm so sorry this happened to you. How frustrating. Is there someone at work you trust (to not use your medical condition against you) that you can prepare in case of an emergency?

Hopefully, this won't happen to you again, but it's smart to be prepared. The last thing you want people to do is sit you up!

To try and find a positive in all of this... how great that it happened around experienced medical personnel who took good care of you!

Take it easy on yourself today. Syncope and even presyncope can take a lot out of you.

I hope you are feeling better soon.

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((((((((((((BIG HUGS))))))))))))))

I haven't fainted in nearly seven years, but it was a miserable experience when it happened. I'm so sorry this happened to you. How frustrating. Is there someone at work you trust (to not use your medical condition against you) that you can prepare in case of an emergency?

Hopefully, this won't happen to you again, but it's smart to be prepared. The last thing you want people to do is sit you up!

To try and find a positive in all of this... how great that it happened around experienced medical personnel who took good care of you!

Take it easy on yourself today. Syncope and even presyncope can take a lot out of you.

I hope you are feeling better soon.

Thanks Deucykub,

I actually work in the HR department, so I know what they can and can't do to me... I have FMLA. :D So my department can know what's wrong, I'm not worried about them using it against me.

Yes, the people that take care of my children took great care of me, too. I am grateful to them. I just feel REALLY silly about it happening with doctors and nurses at a children's hospital.

I am taking it easy. I am so achy today. Especially my legs. :)

I hope this does not become a regular event. If it happens once, does that mean it will keep happening?

Thank you so much everyone,

Angela

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Hi and I am so sorry you had to suffer thru that. I have been fainitng since I was little and I think the key is to try and figure out what you feel just before it happens... That way you can get down and minimize the damage..or get out of the room from where the kids are. My daughter has only seen me faint once and it did scare her. But she laid with me for a long while and we talked about what happened.

<<Hugs>>

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angelika,

i am sorry that this happened to you and (as a mommmy myself) i know how you must feel seeing your kids so scared of what happened.

i've been fainting a lot in the past and know that it doesn't always mean you keep fainting (i know that there are people who do, but it doesn't go for everybody), as i haven't been fainitng for years now (or just now and then). and yes the nurse is right, it does happen more often in people with pots (dysautonomia in general), which doesn't mean it isn't serious. it is scaring and dangerous as you might get injured because of fainting. my body is warning me when i start to yawn and i get very pale. after years i learned i need to lie down when this starts, or better: try to prevent it (like my cardio advised).

hope you will feel better soon,

corina :)

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Maybe you just got up too quickly or were dehydrated. Try not to think about "what if's" it can become

an obsession very quickly (I know from experience). I was homebound for 2 years afraid of fainting.

I remember when my son turned 12, I let him have 7 boys come for a sleep over. All of a sudden my

heart rhythm went to SVT and everytime I sat up, I fainted. I was the only adult home.

They had to call 911. When the ambulance got to our home (20 minutes), there were these

8 sets of eyes outside looking into my bedroom window. Happy Birthday or what?

I have gotten to the point where I stopped worrying about it, I have fainted in grocery stores and been laid on the conveyor belt, department stores having people walk over me, home alone (which I hate!!!!!!!!!!!).

I refuse to let it rule my life. I am not minimizing how scary it is, but worrying does not help.

You need to learn to just "ride the wave" as my last psychologist said. I am still working on that one.

Dawn

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Sorry you fainted....it can be embarassing, shocking, makes the person feel insecure in a way. But it's great that it doesn't happen frequently in your case.

Just wanted to comment on the kids' reaction. My daughter (almost 4 yrs old now) has seen me faint hundreds of times...I faint often and it's been going on since before her birth. She always gets upset. Sometimes it's anger, sometimes sorrow, sometimes fear. I always explain to her, "Mommy doesn't feel any pain. It doesn't hurt. It's just like sleeping." This seems to help. The only thing that totally relieves her onlooker agony is having someone else there to help her. If my sister-in-law (who lives next-door) is there, she takes her and plays with her (not by force, if she wants to stay near mommy, she's allowed). She became very cool headed about the faints after that. She gets upset again when we're alone. Sometimes she lays on me while I'm asleep and cries, or says, "No, mommy I need you. don't sleep mommy." The best thing is when others are there to help her feel like she is still cared for and protected, and when adults in the room don't over react, when everyone treats it like something harmless (which it is).

Another short point...I don't think the ER has anything to offer us fainters. They just waste our time and energy. But you should follow up with your doctor and let him/her know about this recent development. Hopefully it's just a fluke. But be careful about your fluids, salts, etc. for the next few days....as you probably know. Maybe the room was crowded and hot? The weather is heating up these days in my area. Don't know about yours....but I've had lots more symptoms since summer hit.

Hope you feel better soon!

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Sometimes, just preparing can arm you with some control to make the possibility of a faint less traumatic. First, your kids need to be aware- on their level- what is going on. It is frightening even for adults to have a lot of medical professionals rushing around checking on mom. So,explain to your children that a faint is just a weird way of your body reacting to a funky heartbeat. They need to know that it is actually a positive thing and a way your body takes care of itself (even though it certainly doesn't feel like a positive thing).

If they are old enough, show them how to call Dad at work so they will know what to do if they are alone and mom passes out. You can program the number in your phone and have just one button for them to hit to get up with Dad- if needed. Paramedics may not be necessary every time you faint (if you even faint again) but a plan is necessary.

Is there a neighbor that is close enough your children could safely go to and knock on their door if something happens? Have a team in place BEFORE something happens- I have been there- alone A LOT with two small children so I am speaking from my own experience. I do not let the "fear of fainting" dictate my life because we have a way of managing it if it does happen. I do everything I can to prevent myself from getting ill but sometimes it happens anyway- so when it does, I fall back on the plans we have already.

I have a cell phone on me at all times. I have my gatorade, crackers, and med info cards on me at all times, too. Everyone at my husband's job is well aware of our situation so they know the importance of getting him to the phone if I call. I have neighbors that are aware, I have a church support system in place with friends that will come and get my kids if I have to go to the hospital- so I am speaking from years of living with this mess. Be prepared- think like a Boy Scout- lol. It really does help.

As an aside, taking my kids to the doctor can be one of the worse things for me symptom- wise. It is a horrible trigger for me- the stress of "waiting" with nervous kids- a room full of people- most of who are sick, the noise, the stress of trying to make it there on time, the rushing- all of it- stinks. So, for me it is not uncommon for me to get sick at the doctor's at all so that might be an explanation for your faint as well. Hope some of this helps- hang in there!

Carmen

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I am sorry for you and your children. Maybe if you explain them that there is nothing serious going on and what they should do when you faint... they can feel better and useful. (you had some excellent suggestions from others here) :)

What else can I say? I know how sudden it can happen...

A big hug for you

I hope you feel better soon

Love,

Tessa

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Thanks everyone, you had great suggestions.

You are right, the ER wasn't any help. The children's doctor wanted me to go there because of my chest and back pain primarily. Since I have a lot of trust in her, I followed her advice.

I guess my biggest worry is work. My job is stressful, and I just got some bad news today about our departmental situation. They were going to hire some more system support, and now that is probably not going to happen. I couldn't get my work done in 40 hours before I got so sick, now I'm working 20 and they still want everything done. My boss and I clash on a regular basis, and I just don't know how I'm going to handle it. I have to work because I hold the benefits.

I think the kids will handle things better IF I faint again. I haven't had any more episodes, just light headedness and I fell over once or twice, but only because I got dizzy.

I don't think I was stressed about the doctor visit. We have been seeing this same doctor for several years and the kids absolutely love her. I enjoy her insights and talking with her. She is great with my kids. Also, since it was at the hospital clinic, they keep that place COLD, so I know I didn't get overheated. Maybe too much walking that day...

Thanks everyone,

Angela

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