Jump to content

diagnoses of mvp


Recommended Posts

had an echo done yesterday. first one in two years. post ablation too. she showed me where i have a pretty significant mitral valve prolapse. since no one has ever seemed to notice it before and now i have a click in my heart sounds, i am assuming it occured, or at least reared its ugly head after my ablation, which is why i got so much sicker. so i looked up mvp and saw my life right in front of my eyes. i have seen mvp mentioned here, but none of my docs have mentioned it to me. i have sort of ignored it, thinking it didn't pertain to me, especially because of the low bp's most people seem to have, when mine is malignant. but there definately seems to be a connection. so hooray, today i feel validated. my cardio may not acknowledge it, but my primary will. now if i could just this bp under control..... morgan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Morgan, glad to hear you're getting more information about what's going on with you! My cardiologist mentioned MVP as a possible cause of my tachycardia before running all the tests (stress echo and the autonomic tests that confirmed pots). I didn't have mvp...

I don't know anything about the connection between mvp and blood pressure, but it sounds like you're on track to find out!

Good luck,

m

Link to comment
Share on other sites

About 20 years ago I was told I have mitral valve prolapse by a cardiologist who made the diagnosis on hearing the soft click when listening to my heart. Subsequent echocardiograms have all come back with the note on the print-out "non-diagnostic for mitral valve prolapse." The original cardio said he didn't care what the echos showed--I had MVP because he could hear it. My docs decided it must be mild and I even stopped taking an antibiotic to go to the dentist.

Last year I had an echo. This one was so much more sophisticated than the earlier ones. The cardiologist said there was no evidence of MVP and he listened to my heart. He also checked my records and said that neither his predecessor nor Dr. Grubb noted hearing the soft click when they had listened to my heart. Based on all of this, he decided to take away the diagnosis of MVP.

How about that? If I did have it in the first place, then now it's gone! Or was it even there in the first place? Anyway, this has to be a first for me--to get a diagnosis removed, when all I have ever done in the past is add new ones!

Michigan Jan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm not sure how an mvp can go away. that's pretty weird. but i have developed the click since the ablation and it was so clear on the echo even i could see it flopping around. but as the tech said, the doctor will decide. and we will see. thanks for the input. :D morgan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I believe the connection between MVP and dysautonomia is that, much of the time, MVP is simply a symptom of dysautonomia much like an episode of lightheadedness would be. If one's blood volume is low, then there's not another blood in one heart chamber to fully hold closed the mitral valves to the next chamber. That lack of pressure due to the low volume allows the mitral valves to slightly "flop" or prolapse backwards. Well, it stands to reason that if you have an echo on a day when your blood volume is a little bit better, then no MVP will show up. Certainly there are many cases where the MVP is due to a legitimate heart condition, but it is alleged that "most" cases of MVP are really simply a symptom of dysautonomia. And low blood volume is a widespread problem within the dysautonomia "family" (thus all the talk about drinking plenty of fluids).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the connection between MVP and dysautonomia is that, much of the time, MVP is simply a symptom of dysautonomia much like an episode of lightheadedness would be. If one's blood volume is low, then there's not another blood in one heart chamber to fully hold closed the mitral valves to the next chamber. That lack of pressure due to the low volume allows the mitral valves to slightly "flop" or prolapse backwards. Well, it stands to reason that if you have an echo on a day when your blood volume is a little bit better, then no MVP will show up. Certainly there are many cases where the MVP is due to a legitimate heart condition, but it is alleged that "most" cases of MVP are really simply a symptom of dysautonomia. And low blood volume is a widespread problem within the dysautonomia "family" (thus all the talk about drinking plenty of fluids).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michigan Jan,

I had the exact same thing happen to me with MVP. Three different doctors hear a click in my heart, but echo does not show it. It did show "mild mitral regurgitation," which I thought was the same thing as prolapse, but it's apparently not.

I also took antibiotics for eight years before the diagnosis was overturned. Then I see the other day on TV that taking too many antibiotics can cause breast cancer. Great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what a crazy world. my pcp did hear a murmur and click this time which was not present before. it doesn't really help because the cardiologist won't recognize it. they see it as a benign condition and therefore not worthy of a note about it on the report. then he didn't even send the report to my pcp! jerky doctors. :ph34r: thanks for your input guys. validation is always a good thing. morgan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...