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Can Pots Be Inherited?


Tammy
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Hi!

I was thinking this morning about when I was growing up my mom was sick alot but never really knew why but yet she had days where she functioned pretty well too. She didn't talk about it much but would just tell me that she wasn't feeling well and that she needed rest and would ask me to play quietly. As I got to be a teenager, she still had days that were hard but I remember them being more migraine headaches being the problem. I also recall over the years that she'd had to go in to the doctor after she'd "fall" off something or in the middle of something she'd just "blackout" and hurt herself in the process. Again, never really talked much about it and it didn't really phase me as this just was the way things were. Now, even though I was healthy growing up -- always needed more sleep and was easily fatiqued -- but not like what I deal with now -- could this be a form of an inherited disease even though for me it started after I over-exerted myself and than the second flare, which was and continues to be worst than the first 3 year spell, from very stressful events? Any information or knowlegde about this would be appreciated :)

Thanks -

Tammy

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The short answer is "yes" it can be inherited--but not a lot is understood about how, exactly.

For those with EDS, POTS or NCS may be a symptom of the bigger problem, and there is a bit better understanding of the genetics, but not for all types of EDS, including the type that I have.

There are also a few known genetic causes of autonomic issues, including familial dysautonomia, a variant of angiotensin (effects blood pressure) gene, and norepinephrine transporter deficiency. See the DINET "causes" page for more information.

http://www.dinet.org/what_causes_pots.htm

Nina

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Hi Tammy,

You could be describing my mother, too (and, her mother as well!) Yes, I'm convinced that mine is inherited as my son is also DXed with NMH and GI motility problems. His pediatrician at Hopkins, Dr. Peter Rowe, says dysautonomia is often familial in nature.

Julie

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There may be a maternal inheritance to the autonomic dysfunction through the mitochondrial DNA which everyone inherits from their mothers. This has not been studied however, but mother-children patients affected by dysautonomia have been observed clinically. Additionally, there may be certain phenotypes (expression of specific genetic types) of beta-receptors that run in families that may predispose family members to hypotension and autonomic dysregulation. Large-scale studies that are heavily funded and supported by multiple academic centers would be required to provide further research in the genetic component of the autonomic disorders.

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