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Unbelivable Job Advice!


Guest tearose
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Guest tearose

I don't know if I should laugh, cry or sigh!

A placement agency that is suppose to help people with disabilities was just on the telephone with me...

I was explaining that I will compromise a little in salary because I need a certain environment because I have physical disabilities, but I needed a middle management job or my brain would atrophy!!..

They said ..."well since finding a job is important to you, have you considered dumbing down your resume'?"

:rolleyes::huh: :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh:

I was silent for about two seconds and said..."absolutely not, there has to be some organization out there that will want my skills, abilities and integrity"

I am still in disbelief!! :huh:

go figure...tearose

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I find that very offensive!!! Good grief!

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Guest tearose

Yeah! Cheeky buggers! :)

Gee you are all so supportive, thanks!

It is bad enough I need to ask for a special chair for sitting, for presentations, a climate controlled environment, no stairs, reasonable hours...but I have a brain and a master's degree...I don't understand how these people think they are helping us?

Maybe I should apply there for a job and do some organizational re-design!!!

thanks again!

tearose

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Tearose,

I think you may be on to something---- you should make this suggestion to them!!! Seriously. You would be a wonderful person for such an agency that clearly needs to reconsider their standards to meet their mission or maybe a state agency that offers similar services.

:)

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I have to say it doesn't surprise me...I've heard this happening before. Great idea working for them!!!! hahaha whip them in shape!

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I've heard it before too, you can have difficulty finding a job because your over qualified. I would think that would make you a good catch- but apparently not. Maybe "they" think you will move on when you find something better. Perhaps you should ask why they think dumbing down would land you a job easier.

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"a little food for thought"

If you are "overqualified"

If you are a high-skilled worker such as a computer programmer, reach the age of 40, or have more than 10 years of experience, and don't want to go into management, then you will be confronted with being rejected for jobs for being "overqualified". Recent surveys of hiring managers show that more than 95 percent of them either have never hired anyone with more than 10 years experience, or would not consider doing so. There is no easy way of getting around this problem. You just have to adapt to it the best way you can.

The first thing you need to do is understand what is going on. Here are the salient elements:

1. Rejection for being "overqualified" is a fairly recent cultural development. There was no such thing before the 1970s.

2. "Overqualified" is not just about age, although those over 40 may be presumed to be "overqualified".

3. HR professionals, who are also a fairly recent development, and many hiring managers, would rather leave a job undone than risk being criticized for making a "bad hire". There is no downside for reporting that no one could be found to fill the position.

4. Hiring managers often have a personal agenda that differs from the best interests of their company, and a worker who has more skills or knowledge than the minimum needed to do the job may be a threat to the hiring manager and the established order in the department. This attitude has been expressed by some in such words as, "They've seen it all and want to show you how it's done."

5. Highly experienced technical workers are also seen as misfits by co-workers. As a manager once put it, "It doesn't work to start a senior guy at an entry level because he knows too much, and sets a standard the others can't match, but if we start him at a high level the others resent him for not having come up though their ranks. It is easier to just avoid the problem by not making the hire."

6. Hiring managers will usually prefer to fill a position with someone underqualified, or leave the job undone, than hire someone who is "overqualified".

7. The myth that "overqualified" workers are more likely to leave for a better job is just that. Nonoverqualified workers are just as likely to leave. It is only the incompetents who cling to the job. But the myth is deeply entrenched.

8. It is not about obsolete skills, and retraining is not the solution, unless it is for working in an entirely different field, such as carpentry.

9. Discrimination against the "overqualified" is relentless. Don't believe protestations that they don't discriminate on the basis of age or experience or "overqualification", or when they point to a token "old guy". They are lying.

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Guest tearose

Thank you for the additional support! And as a couple of you suggested, I seriously did give it thought and spoke to the same person about my concern with his guidance. I was extremely diplomatic!!! He said, he was overloaded with paperwork and apologized. I said that it was okay but I has some "professional suggestions" and he asked me to share them. After my few ideas, he then suggested that I put together a presentation and bring it to him! See, we may be on to something!

pat57 thank you for your wonderful and complete thoughts on this issue. I see you have a lot of experience in the behind the scenes understanding of these problems. It has given me a new insight into what I am up against. Have you had to do the adapting you refer to? What does one do? I have removed all dates from my resume so my age is unknown.

I have to believe that given some more time and networking I will find something! Am I in a fantasy land? time will tell I guess.

best regards,

tearose

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Guest tearose

many thanks for your good wishes masumeh.

I am in the search and interview process. It may take many months more, but I am determined to find the right job, a career actually, so it may take some time. It is worth waiting for.

best regards, tearose

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  • 2 weeks later...

Don't give up. You should be able to find a part time desk job that appreciates your smarts.

I had 3 "head-hunters" looking for a job for me 4 years ago. I was also looking myself. I am the one who found my job even though those head hunters were professionals. I had lots of people who were not interested at all after a few minutes of hearing my limitations. I found another job as a physician even though the medical community in general can be very harsh and demanding of its workers. We are expected to show up for work unless we are half dead ourselves.

There has to be some-one out there who sees your talents as outweighing any limitations.

I have a very good friend whose husband is in a wheelchair after spinal cord injury. He does research on spinal cord injury. I think that would be so neat to be employed in a job that could help others with disabilities. I guess I do that too in a different way. You might have an opportunity to do the same for this company that is supposed to be helping disabled people.

Karyn

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Guest tearose

Karyn, thank you for that post. I need some uplifting stories! I am taking computer refresher classes starting next week and I have never learned power point...so I am trying to take my skills up to the highest levels and make it very attractive to hire me! I don't want to only do computer work, but I do see that middle managers in my field are more in demand if their computer skills are up to date. I guess you could say I am retooling/retraining.

I think if I could pick the ideal environment, I would love to work for a non-profit organization doing research and education in dysautonomia and autonomic dysfunction!

After my computer classes I will be planning a new strategy for finding the ideal part time job. We will see where this path leads. I am keeping an open mind. I'll keep you posted!

best regards,

tearose

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hey tea!

that is a very good idea, taking computer refreshment classes. my 16 year old son has made some BEAUTIFUL power point presentations this year that (i'm sure) will help him passing his exams this year.

when the youth can learn, so can we (although we might learn a bit slower??? but: who cares :lol::lol: )

good luck!!!

corina :)

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My 11 year daughter is in 5th grade and already learned to use powerpoint!! My 5 year old preschooler uses the computer with confidence. It amazes me.

You go tea! Make yourself as invaluable as possible. You want to be as qualified/attractive as possible to overshadow the physical limitations. Some of our limitations don't matter with a desk job so I would not even mention to avoid clutter. For example, I would not even mention not being able to use stairs unless you think that you would be working in a building without an elevator.

I will never forget one of the places that offered me a job. They said, "We do not feel that we are "settling". This statement was made despite my limitations, and made me feel so valued. I would have taken that job but the location was too far away from family. There ARE great employers out there but we just have to hunt aggressively for them.

Good luck,

Karyn

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