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RockyRoo

Wacky Dysautonomia Diet? no raw fruits and veggies?

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Hi all,

My neuro has recommended that I don't eat raw fruits and veggies and that I see a motility specialist. She stated that dysautonomia starts in the gut somehow, though they aren't sure how. Basically I'm supposed to eat low fiber bc my gut doesn't digest those foods well and then they just sit there. I'm not doubting this and it does kind of make sense, I'm just curious if anyone else was put on a low fiber diet? 

I'm missing my fruits and salads. :(

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Well - mind you that this is just my own personal opinion and not medical advice, but I think that is another one of those theories that someone came up with. There is NO proof that dysautonomia starts in the gut, maybe a study that claims that many dysautonomia patients have GI problems in common. Although I do admit that many patients - myself included - have longstanding nutritional deficiencies and GI problems. Some patients have GERD, IBS, others have gastroparesis ... I personally believe the studies that have proven this to be a SYMPTOM of dysautonomia, not the cause. The problem with dysautonomia is that because the ANS affects soo many body systems it is very difficult o pinpoint what is the cause and what is the symptom. If your neurologist knows of a study that definitely links dysautonomia to originating in the gut I would really like to read that because it would be groundbreaking information. ---- I DO however follow a diet avoiding raw fruits and veggies because I have both severe GERD as well as IC and do not tolerate raw foods. I was concerned about eating only cooked foods but a dietician told me that cooked veggies are OK as long as they are not cooked in tooo much liquid or as long as you also consume the liquid it was cooked in.  I - again, personally - doubt that low fiber is good for anyone except people with DIAGNOSED ( through testing ) GI conditions where this diet is indicated. But I am not saying you should not follow the advice of your doctor, just ask him for more info since you obviously have some doubts about this. 

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Yes, but typically that type of diet is for gastroparesis, like Pistol said. Makes me wonder what your doc is thinking. Some docs treat dysautonomia as a symptom of 'leaky gut', but to my knowledge, there is no real proof that contributes. There is anecdotal evidence. I don't know. I'm also not sure leaky gut is a mainstream medical diagnosis or more of a holistic approach to healing. I'm out of my depth here. Other people will know more and can support or shoot down my leaky gut theory.

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I have long-term history of IBS so she told me to follow this diet and go see a gastro doc who's a motility specialist. Of course that appointment isn't until August. I have to say that intuitively it makes sense to me. I've had two stomach x-rays in the past several years where the docs said I was full of crap, literally. I also have a redundant bowel so basically things just don't move through my system. Since following the diet I've felt pretty good. 

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Well - if your xrays show fecal build-up should you not take MORE fiber? Also - have you had GI studies done?  

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I can confirm and prove, empirically,  that dysautonomia does not start in the gut.  That data comes from an active research project I'm working on.  I can't elaborate too much more at this time. I wish I could.   We are working on stuff which probably won't be in practice in medicine for at least another 10+years.  

Now, GI motility has A LOT to do with the microbiome in your gut, more so than diet.  But it's a catch 22.  Even if you have the right balance of microbial flora in the gut, without the right diet you'll lose that balance.   Without getting into much detail, fiber isn't all its cracked up to be in terms of getting your GI tract moving.  The best advise I can give from the research so far is to eat a diet of real, fresh foods (food that doesn't come in a box), more along the lines of what your grandparents might have eaten.  Fermented foods such as kimchee, yogurt, and quality cheeses are also good.  Fats are good and necessary, and they don't make you fat.  Be careful on sugar intake as many bacteria unfriendly to you love sugar.  Sugars will make you fat, especially the more processed they are.  Avoid preservatives when possible.  Think about it: if the pests and bacteria don't want to eat it, why would you?

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I think your neurologist's reasoning is ill informed and not based on scientific evidence, however if you have GI problems and found improvement after excluding these things, and are getting your nutrients in other ways, then I would stick with what suits you. 

We are all different, and whilst GI motility can certainly be affected by dysautonomia, I do not believe dysautonomia is caused by eating certain foods. I've had a lazy gut since childhood and take a daily laxative, but eat what I want. I developed POTS at 34 very suddenly and it has had no effect on my digestive system other than feeling sick when presyncopal and sick due to consuming the necessary amount of fluids. 

 

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