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Hypovolumia and kidney problems?


ramakentesh
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I've not seen any research on that. I've had chronic hypovolvemia for more than 10 years and have no kidney disease; all my urine and blood work for kidney disease markers are normal. I'm probably at higher risk than the average person because I had many kidney infections as a child and a few as an adult too.

Nina

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No, I mean that over the past decade I have been tested for my total blood volume. Despite being diligent with hydration, medications and salt, I still have low volume as caluclated by a nuclear medicine test. In particular, my I have fewer red cells than the average bear.

Nina

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Nina,

That is enlightening. Thank you for responding- (I am trying to educate my husband with personal experiences now since presenting him with literature isn't quite doing the trick in getting him to grasp the seriousness of hypovolemia. And if we are to work as a team- to further enlighten Nicole- I need him to understand").

So my question is if you weren't as diligent as you are- what do you think your life would be like?

I might add that having read all your posts since I've joined (and going into your personal website, etc) -that it is clear as clear can be that you do everything humanly possible to make your life as functional as possible. And I must say that I admire you so much for all that you do and the way you have taken the bull by the horns (as as so many on this forum).

Thanks in advance for your next response to my new question.

Bev

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Hi Bev, thanks for you very kind words... I like being here on the forum and feeling part of this community.

As for what my life would be like without keeping up with all my meds, water consumption, etc... well... I don't have to go far to imagine it beause I've been there/done that. Even though I was an avid runner, I couldn't run in the mornings...same with aerobics. And, despite all the exercise, I was still exercise and heat intollerant--I could exercise once every two days or so...more than that and I was terribly sick. Before getting my diagnosis and treatment, I was not very functional. I was barely managing my f/t job and had NOTHING left at the end of each day. I lived alone and would go weeks without food shopping. I kept powdered milk so that I didn't have to go to the store. I would come home from work too tired to cook and ate cereal or pasta most evenings and went to bed. I'd wake up in the morning after at least 10 hours of sleep feeling as if I'd run a marathon the night before and feeling like I still needed more sleep.

I would WANT to get up and moving but physically had to fight to do so. Sometimes I'd roll onto my belly, slide my legs off the bed and lay with my body on the bed and my feet on the floor. I'd wait there until I felt I could stand up without falling. I often bathed at night because the hot water made me too dizzy in the morning.

I didn't travel anywhere. My family thought I was mad at them all...but honestly, I was just too exhausted to drive any distace. My dad was about an hour away and my mom and sisters were 3 hours... too far to do alone. I took vacation time at home and slept... lots.

I had all sorts of comensation strategies that I didn't even realize I was doing--like to wash the dishes, I was always rocking from my heels to my tip toes. It wasn't until I lived with Teri that I realized I stood on my toes all the time when a task required me to be in one spot, standing--I was compressing my calves to send blood back north. I also keep my home cold--Teri's quote to friends about our home "Dress warm. Nina keeps the house as cold as a meat locker". No one passes out from the heat at our house, least of all, ME.

I also think that my exercise regimen kept me from becoming totally disabled. That's why I still try to push myself to take a walk or do something physical--I know I wont feel good during and after, but that it keeps my heart and muscles doing their best to help me on my bad days...and maybe helps me have fewer bad days.

:) Nina

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It would be interesting to talk to a kidney specialist about the possible risks that low blood volume might cause.

Which test did you have done to diagnose your low blood volume?

Do you assume that its a problem of renin levels or something along those lines, since even drinking water all day doesnt seem to lift mine much either.

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ramekintesh, I was seeing a renal specialist for many years. The test is called "total blood volume" and is done in the nuclear medicine department. It involves a few blood draws, the first to pull a vial for radiotagging, then reinjection, then a final draw so that they can calculate the total.

Nina

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