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Magnet Therapy


Guest CyberPixie
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Guest CyberPixie

Anyone tried it? It's meant to attract the iron in your blood and push it round your body faster hence increasing your circulation.

I used magnetic insoles for the heavy gravity POTS legs and it did help. I also use magnetic neck collars and back pads for aching joints and muscles , that also helps somewhat.

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I always check http://www.quackwatch.com when looking into alternative treatments. The owner of that site has an article written this year on magnet therapy, which is here: http://www.quackwatch.org/04ConsumerEducation/QA/magnet.html

Nina

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Although I do have a friend with arthritis who feels that the magnets help her, I am very skeptical of any product which may claim to heal you no matter what's wrong with you. When I was pre-diagnosis, a close friend of my husband's who sells magnets was trying to push them on me (with good intention--he was giving them to me for free) and insinuated that if I don't take them, I am rejecting my possibility to heal.

I live in a community with a lot of new-agey kind of friends. So the pressure can be enormous. Once went to a macrobiotic dinner where the speaker was adressing autoimmune diseases. Just eat macrobiotics (and don't take drugs) for lupus, MS etc etc and it will go away. I thought it was pretty irresponsible. Didn't get a chance to tell him so though---after eating a serving of very delicious whole-grained carbohydrate, I promptly blacked out. Must have been a detox reaction, right?

Sorry for the sarcasm, I believe there are some alternative treatments that do help, and I'm for whatever works. I'll even take a placebo if it would help. I'm pretty desparate! Just that a lot of these treatments hurt in the pocketbook, my pocketbook is not exactly overflowing these days, and I have unfortunately been the victim of guilt trips for not parting with whatever little money I have to try something that is meant to cure everything...

Ariella

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Guest dionna

my ma wants me to try the magnets, her ma says they work and my other grandma tried them but wasn't really sure if they actually worked but she tried everything that was new. if she saw the word "new" on a box--- she bought the product and would advertise to the rest of the family if it really worked. i miss her so much! another story another forum--- rare gall bladder cancer took her this past feb. like i told EVERY doctor i saw... i am willing to try anything. like you say even a placebo if it would work! i hope you find something that works for you. take care of yourself until then.

dionna :)

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Guest CyberPixie

So why have Scientists in the UK proven they work and the NHS are prescribing them for patients then, hmm?

There is so much that we don't know about yet, even if it turned out to be psychological, it still seems to work, and if you can get relief in any way you can, then who cares! :)

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It's all very confusing. Pharmaceutical companies are big business, and alternative health products are also big business. "Research" funded by either interest can be misleading.

I personally wouldn't pay money for something that hasn't been recommended by someone with the same condition I suffer from. If the distributer is claiming it helps with circulation problems, I would ask him for contact info of someone who has been helped in this way, and follow up before spending money.

So, you are off to a good start by asking around here.

Good luck!

Ariella

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Actually, I wasn't intending to say it didn't work--Just to be a cautious consumer. Also, I'm suggesting we all be skeptical readers of "research". How a study is designed, how many participants, what statistical tests were employed--all these things matter in determining the "power" of a study.

One of the things I've learned through my graduate school studies is that one can have "statistically significant" findings, but that is not the same as "practical significance." The first one means that the a person or a group's scores are definitely different from the groups that did not get that particular "treatment"... the second one means that the difference in scores can lead to practical and valuable change for that person or group.

All that being said, if it's something isn't likely to be harmful and it's not expensive, I probably would give it a go myself...

Nina

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oh, nina, you are cracking me up and bringing back SERIOUS memories of stats class!!!!!! and all the studies we did in undergrad and read and blah de blah.

ariella, you cracked me up a bit too...i'm with you.

as for magnets...haven't tried them, but am 'skeptical'--but i suppose they might be in the 'can't hurt, might help' category...vs. things that are truly dangerous to try! it just depends on the size of you pocketbook?

emily

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Guest CyberPixie

Well they seem to work for me to some extent, so I'll happily carry on using them. They've proven they heal leg ulcers which can take a year or more to heal, obviously that's increasing circulation. I have a back and neck wrap, some magnetic insoles and just bought magnets on plasters so youc an stick them anywhere.

You have to make sure you get the right magnets, a good strength and north facing (to the body) apparently.

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