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calming breath


Guest Finrussak
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Guest Finrussak

As many of us have problems with anxiety type symptoms ( even if not truly "anxious") I thought this would help. The same site also has various relaxation breath work. I have found almost all of them to help ...but at various times so if one doesnt "do it" for you; try another!!! Im all for doing what I can to lessen my need for more meds :)

Today's Tip (from Dr. Weil site- Dr. Weil.com)

Breathing - A Mental Energizer

If you need a pick-me-up or are feeling a bit anxious, try the following breathing exercise; it can help energize and clear your mind. The first time, do it for just 15 seconds, increasing the duration by five seconds every time until you can complete one full minute. Always breathe normally between exercises.

Sit upright with your back straight, eyes closed, and shoulders relaxed.

Place the tip of your tongue against the bony ridge behind and above your upper teeth.

Breathe rapidly through your nose, in and out, with your mouth slightly closed.

Keep your inhale and exhale short and equal. Your chest should be almost mechanical in its movements - rapid, like air is pumping through it.

Try to inhale and exhale three times per second, if you can, keeping your breath audible.

Ideally, you will feel the muscular effects of this breathing exercise at the base of your neck (just above the collarbone) and at the diaphragm. Put your hands on these areas to get a sense of the movements.

Learn more about the benefits of breathing in Breathing: An Introduction.

What's your view about this tip's subject? Share your thoughts in the DrWeil.com Community. Visit DrWeil.com for more information on this tip topic.

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Hi Finette;

I have been practicing deep, relaxation breathing for the past 6 months and I will say that it has helped tremendously. It truly helps calm the inside. I highly recomend it.

KathyP :)

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I have noticed that if I exhale when I am attempting to walk up stairs it really helps. Don't know why but it seems to slow down my heartrate as it is increasing upon exertion (the up the stairs thing). It has kept me from passing out so yeah, deep breathing can be beneficial.

Carmen

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Thanks, Finette, for this advice. I just read in the doctor's office magazine that a good relaxation therapy is simply to float on your back in a swimming pool. It said if you can't float on your back, then use a semi-deflated raft. Looking forwarad to 2006 when I can float to my heart's content in our pool in Florida!

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