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Fainters That Work


Guest dionna
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Guest dionna

i was wondering if any of you that faint have a job outside of home. i can deal with the pain--- mind over matter--- but i can't hide the fainting. i can't drive and i don't know if an employer would hire me because of liability. desk job? i faint sitting. i even faint laying down if i am THAT bad for the moment. so if any one who faints a lot has a job... could you encourage me a little and prove to me that it IS possible?

dionna :)

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I started working at a warehouse about 2 years ago, and when I got hired I told my boss that I pass out sometimes and to not call 911 because it was normal. For about a year, I only totally fell out like 2-3 times. Then my NCS started getting worse and worse. Pretty soon I couldn't go an hour without blacking out, then like every 10 minutes (it was mostly only momentary). I kept talking to my boss, because I was having to leave all the time because I was too sick to work, or I had to go to the doctor, and I was scared I was going to get fired. My boss wanted to help, so he offered me a position in the office (which blessedly has AC) sitting in front of a computer all day (and getting a big raise!). I have a fan, AC, and people to keep an eye on me if I pass out and make sure I don't hurt myself and such, and I can make my own hours. That way I can go home if I feel too bad. Anyways, I hope this is encouraging. It's quite daunting to try to get a job when you faint all the time. Thankfully, I found one that's amazing.

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i was wondering if any of you that faint have a job outside of home. i can deal with the pain--- mind over matter--- but i can't hide the fainting. i can't drive and i don't know if an employer would hire me because of liability. desk job? i faint sitting. i even faint laying down if i am THAT bad for the moment. so if any one who faints a lot has a job... could you encourage me a little and prove to me that it IS possible?

dionna :)

When my daughter was first diagnosed she was passing out all of the time. The doctor tried differnet meds and they even made her pass out sitting down. Finally they hit upon midodrine (proamtine) which has done miracles. She is back work and has returned to driving. Good luck to you.

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Hi

Without medication I would pass out in less then a minute everytime I stood up. I am now on big doses of midodrine, a beta blocker, mestinon, salt tablets and suppression of menses. With these measures I just feel dizzy frequently everyday but never pass out. I always feel tired.

I left a job as a physician because I could no longer take call (stay up all night) or do hospital work (walk around a lot). I changed to a different job in my profession in a different state 3 years ago. I was very upfront with them about my illness, and limitations. They hired me for what I can do, and I am able to do this job. I use a motorized scooter in the building, and limit my hours.

The bad thing about working with the public is that I get exposed to lots of germs. I have not written in a while because I was down and out with the stomach flu/dehydration, and then flairing of my POTS and migaines thereafter. It took me a month to recover. I missed more than a week of work. I wash my hands after each patient now like I should have done anyway!!! I hate being limited by POTS, but I am so lucky that I have been able to work still. I could not do it without the correct medications, an understanding employer, and cutting out things that I cannot do.

Hope this helps,

Karyn

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Karyn,

What kind of job have you found that you still get to use your skills as a doctor/neurologist, but not have to do the same sort of patient load/on call stuff?

I am grateful you have found something that works for you. I have missed seeing you on the board.

I did read your other post just now too, and I see that still this job takes everything out of you....UGH. And how much you have to sacrifice for it. I am grateful though that you found something that you can do with your limitations...

Best,

Emily

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Thanks Emily. All of my work as a neurologist is still direct patient care, outpatient only. However, I no longer have to take call, or do hospital work. I also no longer have to drive an hour once a month to a satellite office. The primary care physicians with whom I work cover calls after hours for me. Before I was hired for this postion three years ago, I was very specific about what I could not do. However, I also sold them on what I can do. My references also were a huge help. Now three years late, it looks like they will vote me in as a partner. My modest salary will not increase but job security is wonderful.....as long as my health cooperates. I pray for that.

I had two "head hunters" helping me to look for a job 3 years ago, plus I searched too. There were a lot of places who immediately had no interest in me when they heard my limitations. I am just so lucky to have found an employer who did not want to throw me away because of my illness. They value what I CAN do.

My husband took the kids to his parents for a visit. They live one and a half hours away, but I don't do well with travel. It is nice to have the time to write again when the house is quiet. Usually when the kids are here, they get my attention so that I don't have time to write.

Karyn

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Karyn,

Thank you for your response. I always feel torn in a thousand directions with the little energy I have, so it is nice when we get the chance to be online...:lol: I understand you giving your precious energy to the kids when they are home!

I think that you probably make a BETTER doctor b/c of your limitations. You know? I think it gives you some perspective that many doctors never have. It makes me sad that so many places didn't want you b/c of your disability. But, I know that is the breaks of the game in today's world.

I have always wondered what it feels like to be a doctor and then to become disabled and have to be a patient also. I would love to study that! :lol:

I am sure you are a gift to your patients...and I am grateful you have found a position that, with the cooperation of your health, you can thrive in.

Emily

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Guest dionna
I started working at a warehouse about 2 years ago, and when I got hired I told my boss that I pass out sometimes and to not call 911 because it was normal. For about a year, I only totally fell out like 2-3 times. Then my NCS started getting worse and worse. Pretty soon I couldn't go an hour without blacking out, then like every 10 minutes (it was mostly only momentary). I kept talking to my boss, because I was having to leave all the time because I was too sick to work, or I had to go to the doctor, and I was scared I was going to get fired. My boss wanted to help, so he offered me a position in the office (which blessedly has AC) sitting in front of a computer all day (and getting a big raise!). I have a fan, AC, and people to keep an eye on me if I pass out and make sure I don't hurt myself and such, and I can make my own hours. That way I can go home if I feel too bad. Anyways, I hope this is encouraging. It's quite daunting to try to get a job when you faint all the time. Thankfully, I found one that's amazing.

that is exactly what i was doing in the marine corps. i was an ammo tech so i stayed down in the mags isssuing and inventoring the ammo and explosive in all weather conditions in NC... passing out with ammo and explosives... very dangerous... eventually they put me working with the paper work top side but i still passed out frequently. eventually since i was deployable i was discharged. do you drive? that is what i think i would my most problems with... i don't know if i would always have a ride to work. congratulations on the big raise too. that is awesome for you.

and yes it is encouraging. i have posted my resume on line with a lot of company's but once they see i am sick they lose interest even though i am a veteran! i think i got my pots from chemicals or something like that. the marine corps takes full responsiblity of it and know that the military may have caused it cause they can't find any other explaination. if i had gotten it 2 weeks later and i would have been in IRAQ with it. i am just venting now. they upset me. don't get me wrong I LOVE the Marine Corps. i even have USMC on my lower back. the best decision i ever made to better myself and the skills i was taught... help me with being sick and keep me from getting depressed. good luck and thank you very much.

thank you all for the replies.

dionna :lol:

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Dionna, I don't drive...I'm not allowed to because I pass out so much. My husband actually works at the same company I do, and he drives. It's an awesome situation. But there are busses and such normally? I dont' know. I know it ***** because I live within a mile of my work, but I couldn't walk or ride a bike, because being in Florida it's insanely hot outside, and heat makes me pass out within minutes. Good luck with your job hunting!

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Guest dionna

i live kinda in the country and there is no public transportaion. it is 20 bucks for a cab to just get barely into the city. but if i did then the driving/getting there wouldn't be a problem. thank you for the suggestion though. very thoughtful.

dionna :(

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hi dionna :)

i am not sure if this will be helpful...i am fairly well-controlled on my meds/diet now, so i don't faint as much>> i used to faint nearly constantly & i couldn't do anything much at all! after a long while, i found a med/diet/lifestyle combo that worked better. it's been gradual over a period of years for me to be as high-functioning as i am now, a series of baby steps forward & back. during this rollercoaster, i got sick, quit grad school, got a bit better, got my M.A., got sick again, worked, got sick again, then career change (back to school), got sick, worked, now i've stopped work & "just" do school & still get sick. school's a bit easier than work to juggle while i'm getting "re-conditioned" physically (or at least trying!), i think. it's still hard, tho! maybe school is an option for you? learn something new? maybe you could even get it paid for?

i read you are trying some new things out? so maybe with some time, you will even out? hopefully!! people do make great progress, despite this illness & others! although i do still faint, i can "tell" beforehand....i'm guessing you don't have that "luxury"? i can still drive. currently, i'm in nursing school part time, which is not a "real" job, but it takes time & energy, & has its risks. i've been able to work w/ school when i've gotten sick, b/c there *are* days i can't make it thru. this forum has also provided terrific support :)

my doctors have continued to clear me for clinicals (tough days...7+ hrs, sometimes w/o break..very challenging). so far i have had great luck (or my dedication to getting more healthy is actually paying off?) & now i'm officially a senior. it's a trade-off, tho: i have to focus a TON of my energy on school, & so other things like cleaning, gardening or staying in touch with friends have had to get less (or none in the case of housecleaning :) ) of my energy. my husband has stuck by me; he's awesome :D

the BIG test will be to see if i can stay well to actually become a nurse & work, even if part time? i'm terrified to get *really* sick again & not finish school. one solace is that nursing has many options, so if i get thru school, maybe i can find a niche outside the norm? maybe? :):):D it's scary!! i'm certainly not someone to advise how to "work" with dysautonomia, i can only really encourage you to Hang In There, Do Your Thing, Take Good Care & see what you are able to do!! :) you could be amazed at what is around the corner! you could feel better or find an understanding boss :) hold on to hope! :):)

or maybe we could all form a union of "professional patients"? LOL i don't think the pay is very good, but i'm sure we'd all be brilliant at it! :D

dionna, i sincerely wish you the best of luck and thank you for your service as a veteran!your situation certainly does present some tough concerns...best wishes for everything!!

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Hi

Dionna, I hope you can find the job that is right for you. I rather that someone tell me right away that they don't want me for the job, rather than be jerks about my illness after hiring me. Hopefully you are weeding out the jerks, and will find a jewel like I did. Sell them on your strengths. Let them know that it is not a degenerative (progressive) disease.

Emily, thanks again for the words of encouragement. Yes, I definitely am a better doctor because of my illness. I have no doubt. I truely understand my patients' struggles with chronic illnesses. Heck, I have some of the exact same illnesses as they do.....syncope, migraines, neuropathy for example! I try to be patient and listen. I never leave the room without answering all the questions, no matter how late I am running behind.

Karyn

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