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Cerefolin for fatigue and brain fog


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My husband began taking the prescription vitamin supplement Cerefolin about 6 months ago to help with fatigue and brain fog. I read a post on the product from another member of this forum (or maybe NDRF) and our family doctor prescribed it. I noticed an improvement in his thinking (actually a lessening of his forgetfulness) and he noticed an improvement in his level of fatigue and a reduction in nap time.

After about 3 months, we experienced difficulty in obtaining the supplement and finally learned that Rite-Aid is involved with a lawsuit with the manufacturer and will not carry the product. As a result, he did not take it for a couple of months. In the meantime he took regular folic acid and B-12 supplements.

Now he has been taking Cerefolin for about 3 weeks and we have both noticed improvements again, me on the mental sharpness and he has commented on the improvement in his fatigue and also that he is thinking clearer (YEAH!). So, I don't know if this is just wishfull thinking on our part but this is the second time the product has resulted in noticeable improvements.

There is a lot of research on the benefits of folic acid and vitamins B-6 and B-12 on cognition. The supplement is marketed for dementia and Alzheimers patients. It's not cheap. He takes 1 tablet in the morning and has not had any side effects. I'd be interested to hear an update from anyone else using this supplement.

www.cerefolin.com

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Hi:

I have been taking cerefolin since last May. I also take one tab a day. I don't have any side effects. I can't say that I notice as dramatic improvement as your husband, but I don't think it hurts! I think it may help somewhat.

I too had trouble getting it refilled through Rite-Aid. I now get it through Costco...It is not very expensive there...about $35 for a month's supply. (Not that $35 is cheap per se, but it is a LOT cheaper than my provigil med!)

I would recommend it to anyone who is trying to alleviate brain fog.

Kristen

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Guest GayleP

Why is it supposed to help with brain fog? Or rather how? I'm so med sensitive I think I'd be afraid to try it. But I might mention it to my Dr because my brain fog is really bad.

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I am interested in what you had to say about Folic Acid, Vitamin B-6, and B-12. I looked them up, and it looks like they all help to maintain a healthy nervous system. I take a multi-vitamin daily and the label says that it has Folic Acid (400 mcg) in it, Vitamin B-6 (2 mg) and Vitamin B-12 (6mcg). I wonder if that is enough or if I could be taking more to help with brain fog and fatigue (fatigue is one of my worst symptoms, and I would like to take something else to help with it). BuddyLeesWife, how much did your husband take of each when he took the Folic Acid and Vitamins B-6 and 12 while you were waiting to get the Celefolin?

I am seeing my POTS doctor next week, and I will have to ask him about these vitamins.

Hope that you all are doing well...

~Meghan :angry:

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Last year, Dr. Grubb told us that EVERYONE should be taking folic acid for a healthy heart. Take a multi-vitamin with B12 and B6 and an additional 1-2mg of folic acid daily. He said that there is OVERWHELMING evidence that folic acid needs to be added to our diets. It provides something like a 25% decrease in colon cancer and also a decent decrease in breast cancer. The B12 + B6 are needed to make use of the folic acid. My husband was taking 800 mcg of folic acid, 2500 mcg of B12 plus multi-vitamin but he only took 1/3 of the daily dose of the multi-vitamin. He no longer takes the separate folic acid and B12.

Several months after of appointment with Dr. Grubb I saw the post by another member about the Cerefolin and we decided to try that over the Provigil for fatigue because it contains vitamins that were already recommended. Also, if you read up on B-12 deficiency and pernicious anemia the symptoms overlap with many of NCS and POTS.

Regarding the cost, I guess it isn't as bad as I thought. Our co-pay was $93.00 for 180 tablets - a 6 month dose. I'm still not used to having to buy in bulk via mail order.

Regarding why it is supposed to work, I can only forward what I have read. "Elevated levels of homocysteine have been found to be associated with cognitive impairment and folic acid, B-12 and B-6 are the nutritional supplements used to lower homocysteine" (from the manufacturer's literature). Another article from Medscape Cardiology (august 2004) can be found at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/483204?src=search

High Homocysteine Levels Contribute to Cognitive Dysfunction

Interest in homocysteine as a risk factor for CVD has mounted during the last few years. It has been suggested that high levels of this sulphur-containing amino acid can elevate the risk of dementia and depression and can confer significant morbidity and mortality. With the advent of simple assays, homocysteine measurement has become accepted as a standard and routine clinical test.[15]

During the past 15 years, it has been thoroughly documented that moderate elevation of homocysteine levels in serum or plasma is a strong and independent risk factor for occlusive arterial disease and venous thrombosis, and is a predictor of vascular and all-cause mortality. As many as 50% of patients with stroke and other atherothrombotic diseases have high homocysteine levels (> 15 micromol/L).[15]

An association between elevated homocysteine levels and impaired cognitive performance and dementia has also been documented. Several prospective studies have demonstrated that folate and/or vitamin B12 status and elevated levels of homocysteine are predisposing factors for the development of dementia or contribute to an accelerated rate of progression of the disease.[15]

Reduction of homocysteine levels has been shown to increase regional cerebral blood flow and to have a positive impact on cognitive performance in elderly individuals with mild cognitive impairment. However, early intervention appears to be crucial, because severe underlying neuronal and vascular damage is irreversible (although studies in animals suggest the possibility of reversibility of neuronal damage). Vitamin therapy has also been demonstrated to influence the rate of progression of atherosclerosis and to increase endothelium-dependent blood flow.[15]

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Hi:

Thanks for all the info!

By the way, I take cerefolin AND provigil (as well as lexapro and Magox 400)...this combo seems to be the best bet for me at the moment. Although, I would like to try procrit.

Kristen

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