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Found 3 results

  1. I know I rave about Magnesium all of the time . I started taking it due to an off-hand remark that my allergist (from Mayo) made. He was commenting that I needed to better treat my autonomic stuff. I shared my frustration and asked WHAT was left to try. He said, "Magnesium is being used with amazing results." First I had ever heard of it. Since then, I have been using 500mg of magnesium oxide every night. If you've never used it before, beware. It is a fabulous sleep aid. Only take it in the PM, right before you are ready to sleep. Used over time, my body has adapted, somewhat, but it still totally relaxes me. If you need help with a slow GI tract- That's also one of the side effects. Most importantly, it has somewhat normalized by wide HR swings with posture changes and wide BP swings. My overall HR is considerably slower with magnesium and my overall BP is less labile. In the winter, I used to be so affected by the cold weather, that my whole body vasoconstricted. My extremities would turn dark purple/black, my BP would rise, I would even get chest pain. On magnesium, THAT isn't happening. Now, I read that it also helps in preventing migraines! Looking back, mine have been better and less frequent. I have trouble tolerating so many meds that it is wonderful to find a natural mineral that has so many benefits. I just wanted to share. http://www.neurosciencesjournal.org/_cgi-bin/DetailArticle.asp?ArticleId=1624 Relation between serum magnesium level and migraine attacks Mahnaz Talebi, Dariush Savadi-Oskouei, Mehdi Farhoudi, Solmaz Mohammadzade, Seyyedjamal Ghaemmaghamihezaveh, Akbar Hasani, Amir Hamdi ABSTRACT Objectives: The determination of serum magnesium levels in migraine. Methods: In a case control study performed between January 2007 and December 2007 at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran, 140 migraine patients were enrolled and their level of serum magnesium was determined and the results were compared with 140 healthy people who did not have any headache, kidney, or gastrointestinal disorders, and no consumption of magnesium complements. Results: Migraine patients (22 male, 118 female) with a mean age of 33.82+/-10.31 and 140 healthy people (26 male, 114 female) with a mean age of (34.19+/-9.95) were enrolled. Forty patients had aura and 100 patients did not have aura. The average serum magnesium level in the patient group (26.14+/-4.3) was significantly lower than the control (31.09+/-4.32) group (p=0.000). There was no significant difference between the mean level of serum magnesium in patients with migraine with aura and without aura, however, there was a significant linear relationship between the amount of serum magnesium and the frequency of headache. Conclusions: Serum magnesium in migraine patients was significantly lower than the normal population and related to the frequency of migraine attacks, supporting the use of magnesium in prevention and treatment of migraine.
  2. http://en.wikipedia....ion#cite_note-1 Endothelial dysfunction is a systemic pathological state of the endothelium (the inner lining of blood vessels) and can be broadly defined as an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting substances produced by (or acting on) the endothelium.[1] Normal functions of endothelial cells include mediation of coagulation, platelet adhesion, immune function and control of volume and electrolyte content of the intravascular and extravascular spaces. Endothelial dysfunction can result from and/or contribute to several disease processes, as occurs in septic shock, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, it can also result from environmental factors, such as from smoking tobacco products and exposure to air pollution. I found a test to check for this. If there is another test for this let me know. This may be a big help for all of us. It affect every level of POTS. The test http://www.itamar-me...om/EndoPAT.html Prevention and treatment Endothelial function can be improved significantly by exercise and improved diet. A study published in 2005 has determined that a positive relationship exists between the consumption oftrans fat (commonly found in hydrogenated products such as margarine and the development of endothelial dysfunction.[3] Other factors have been identified as improving endothelial function and include cessation of smoking, loss of weight and treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia amongst other things. Some studies have found antioxidants,potassium[4] and arginine supplementation to restore impaired endothelial function.
  3. interesting to note that endothelium regulates this and as noted in Wikipedia certain drugs that are Cholinergic may dilate or constricted depending whether the endothelium is damaged. How many of you know if your endothelium is damaged? BTW is regulates Nitric Oxide... This may be one reason some of us react differently to certain meds even if we have the same type of POTS... Regulation of vascular resistance There are many factors that alter the vascular resistance. Many of the platelet-derived substances, including serotonin, are vasodilatory when the endothelium is intact and are vasoconstrictive when the endothelium is damaged. Cholinergic stimulation causes release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) (later it was discovered that EDRF was nitric oxide) from intact endothelium, causing vasodilation. If the endothelium is damaged, cholinergic stimulation causes vasoconstriction. A cholinergic drug, also known as a cholinergic agent, cholinergic agonist,[4] or a parasympathomimetic drug,[5] is any drug that functions to enhance the effects mediated byacetylcholine in the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system, or both. These include acetylcholine's precursors and cofactors, acetylcholine receptoragonists,acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and cholinergic enzymes: Acetylcholine receptor agonistsAlvameline Muscarine (muscarinic receptors) Nicotine (nicotinic receptors) Pilocarpine (M3 receptors) Suxamethonium (muscle type receptors) Acetylcholine receptor antagonistsScopolamine Dicycloverine Tolterodine Oxybutynin Ipratropium Mamba Toxin (MT7) Pirenzepine Telenzepine Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (abbreviated AChEIs)Donepezil Galantamine Huperzine A Neostigmine Physostigmine Rivastigmine
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