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Tamarackteacher

Iep/504 Accommodations

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:) IEP/504 Accommodations

Hi, I am new to the forum and joined in order to support friends of mine that have a teenager with a recent diagnosis of POTS. We are looking for examples of IEP or 504 accommodations that have been helpful to students in their efforts to complete high school and move onto college. Any ideas or advice would be appreciated. Thank you. TTeacher :D

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I'm not really sure if I can be any help, as I honestly don't know what either of the things you were talking about are, however I am a high school student with POTS, (sophomore this year) and I am still attending school regularly. So I haven't had any special "plans" or what your talking about, but there are things I have done that are beneficial to me. If you want to PM me with questions or anything I would be happy to help out in any way I can.

Good luck!

Mary

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I'm in the process of working with my son's high school to put together an IEP. He's a sophomore and hasn't been able to attend much at all this year. He was previously a straight A student. He's withdrawn from history and spanish for the rest of this year because he doesn't need 4 years of those subjects. He's doing math at home with a tutor; the tutor also works with him on chemistry at home, but my son tries to get to his class as often as possible and MUST attend the weekly labs. The English department has told him that he needs to read the 6 books that the class is reading and write reports on those 6 books, but doesn't need to attemd class. If he can fulfill those requirements, he'll get the credits for taking English. He also takes a Computer Science elective (which he loves) and tries to get to as often as he can. If he can show up for class the majority of the time, and complete a special project assigned by the teacher, then he'll get a grade. If he can't make it to class very often, he will be "medically excused" and won't get a grade or credit for the class.

The school has been great about rearranging his schedule so the classes he needs to attend are in the afternoon. (He is non-functional in the morning). We're hoping to get the school to agree to videotape the classes he's missing, but I'm not sure yet if that can be worked out.

Even with everything the school is offering, this isn't going to be easy. My son has no energy, is dizzy and nauseous, headachy, and has increasing brain fog. He can't concentrate on much at all anymore. But at least I'll know that we gave it a good try! Having the mornings off and withdrawing from 2 classes has taken a lot of the pressure off, and lets him get some extra sleep which is essential for him.

Good luck to your friends. I hope their son's school personnel is as supportive as ours.

-Lenna

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This may be a little off the beaten path as for an answer to your qestion, but here's a look at IEP/504 Plans and how it works. Before getting sick, I worked in our district's special education department coordinating IEP/504 Plans, so have a pretty good knowledge of the process involved. I can't say which accomodations/modifications your friends child will specifically need, but parently input is a huge part of which services or adaptations to the child's education plan should be made in order to help the child be successful and ultimately comes down to parent signature / agreement for implementation of the plan. Bringing documentation and information to the meeting about POTS is helpful to create a better understanding of what accomodations may be helpful. All team members involved in writing the IEP or 504 plan are there to help the child succeed. If an agreement is unable to be reached, contacting the Director of the Special Education Department can be resourceful in certain situations but rarely does this happen.

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Some of the things that come to mind, for either type of plan (I think 504 would be more appropriate unless the student has additional issues such as a learning disability) that might be useful depending on how severe the issues are:

limited time standing in one place/standing in line

temperature controlled environment

frequent access to fluids/salt, or salty snacks

access to a safe place to lie down as needed

(and you can get more ideas from the section of the dinet site called "what helps")...

If you want to PM me, we can discuss some of the issues-FYI, I teach undergraduate and graduate special education courses at a local Univ.

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Hi There-

I'm a parent of a teen with an autonomic dysfunction and chronic fatigue syndrome. I've stumbled across an excellent website that offers

actual examples of 504 plans, etc. It is the Pediactric Network for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Orthostatic Intolerance. The site address is: www.pediatricnetwork.org

They have a whole section devoted to school issues. Best of luck

Julie

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I too have a daughter in High school that suffers from POTS/NMH, CFS, EDS and Von Willebrands. She has missed a lot of school and needs accommodation's for her to make it through the school day.If you want to e-mail me at huzzymay@gmail.com I can scan her 504 plan so you can see what accommodation's she has and how they are written out. Best of luck.

Nolie

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The 504 plan may be the way to go. As you have heard, it is designed to help kids that don't qualify for an IEP but who also need special accommodations. However, when I was in NC we had a few students with juvenile diabetes and other issues that affected them more than others as Other Health Impaired. The gave them an IEP. This may not work if a special ed teacher isn't needed, but is another avenue to pursue. Good luck.

Amy

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:angry: Thank you all so much for your replys these last few days. The information has been helpful and supportive to myself and my friends. The websites offered have been very helpful as well. Since we have a diagnosis now we are just beginning to get people on board with regards to their knowledge and the necessary flexibility and accommodations. Once I figure out what "PM me" means and how to do it I may take you up on your offers. I wish all of you a successful week.

tamarackteacher

"...in the end, only kindness matters..."

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Hello! I just wanted to add that I'm a college student currently arguing with my university about my disability accomodations plan. (They're concerned that I'm missing too much class....the missing class comes from not being concious all of the time...) The school is asking their lawyer what they can legally do as far as saying I can only miss so many days, etc. If you'd like, I can let you know what they say so that you have some idea of what you might end up fighting.

Meg

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You should request that your son have a home tutor if he has been absent a certain number of days in a row, ie 3 days. It is hard to make up that level work by yourself. Being labeled "chronically ill" in my state has certain advantages, although no one likes to have a label. Martha

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