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What Kind Of Jobs Etc. Does Everyone Have?


ajw4790
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Hi all!

In looking over people's posts it looks like a lot of people are students or are in/going into the medical field like myself.

So, I was curious what kind of jobs people have/had? I keep wondering how well I will do in my chosen profession after I get out of grad school. So, I was wondering how this aspect of dealing with dysautonomia has worked out for everyone?

I know it is different for everyone, and a lot of other factors tie in (ie family etc.).

But how has dysautonomia affected your education/career?

So, I am in the beginning of my second year of grad school, and have two more years to go, and then hope to be able to work full time, if able... Already, been told that there will be some things I can't or shouldn't do...

Wondering if the debt is worth it?! :(

Thanks for any input! :)

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I'm a newspaper copy editor. So I sit on my butt at a computer all day. POTS has no effect except for feeling lightheaded when I walk to the printer!

I might be switching jobs soon, however. My husband just got a job with day hours. I work 3 p.m. to 1 a.m.!

I don't know about grad school being worth it. Luckily, my chosen career doesn't require it.

Amy

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Hi there,

I'm a graduate student in England in the field of translation studies. Eventually I will be a full-time translator! (Sitting at my computer most of the day using the coolest parts of my brain <_< )

:P

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Oh and regarding grad school- I feel, personally, that if you love what you're studying and you're getting a good education, then it's definitely worth it. I think that I would be a student forever if I could. I, too, will have a hefty load of student loans to pay off, and my career will probably not permit a terribly extravagant lifestyle, but on the other hand, I'll have a job in a field that I love, bringing otherwise inaccessible literature to the masses. So as long as I can pay my loans off and not live in enormous debt, it will be worth it financially, too, because education and experience are invaluable to my chosen path.

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I'm only a high schooler, but i work at an apple orchard, however i plan to attend college to become a doctor, bot sure what type yet though. Not children, but i don't know what i would want to specialize in, if healthy enough though i would want to become a surgeon, otherwise something in diagnostic medicine maybe...

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Attorney- with a blanket around me and an ottoman under my desk to keep my feet up (this part is CRUCIAL!).

I was with the state, which was much better for me than private practice is proving to be. We had some VERY stressful times where I worked, and, I almost always worked 40+ hours a week. But it still wasn't as many hours as in private practice, and I had much better insurance and leave (though you do make more money in PP). Plus, I could take advantage of natural down time easier- in PP, when you have downtime, you're supposed to go find more work to do and clients to bill. I loved my job, and would still be there if it weren't for the fact that we had to move to a different part of the state!

Since everybody's talking about grad school, I have to say that law school was probably the best "job" because of the flexibilty in my schedule (at least after first year) and the fact that I could study on the couch in my p.j.'s. In some ways, I think that we can really do better at a lot of academic/intellectual (i.e. non-physical) pursuits than a lot of "normal" people because having this sort of condition forces you to become much more self-aware and realistic about your abilities and what you need to do to meet your goals. Plus, if you've ever had to struggle just to get out of bed in the morning and get dressed the way we sometimes do, then you know that reading a couple of chapters, particularly on a good day, is nothing to complain about! So, when at graduation, I was receiving my degree summa cum laude, my friends that I used to be jealous of for their ability to go out and function on just a few hours' sleep were like, "hmm...so that's what you were doing all those times that you weren't at the bar with us!"

good luck!

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I'm an academic, which means teaching and research. Teaching is six hours a week of classroom time, which I manage by alternating positions. I warn my students from the start that I move from sitting, standing, to sprawling across the desk. Most of the rest of the time is in front of the computer upright writing/research, or reading/grading/meeting with students in my recliner. The job is flexible. I need to cover my classes at specific times, but the rest of the work I can do when/where I please, as long as it gets done. There are faculty meetings, but my colleagues know about my issues and are tolerant of my strange position changes. My joint problems from eds are currently much more disruptive than pots. But I still need a lot of flexibility in hours and position, or I pay the consequences.

My health was pretty good through grad school which I finished in 99, and I abused my body-- sitting badly for too long, carrying too many books, etc.

But I have no regrets.

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I *try* to each IT in a hospital to all staff from cleaners through to senior consultants. At times very rewarding at others (like today) downright frustrating. Just because you have a medical doctrate that doesn't mean you can sit IT exams and not do any work (honestly!) and I've lost track of the number of times I've had to defuse a situation because they have failed and are blaming me (cos yes it's my fault they didn't bother to revise). :blink: So it means both my IT degree and counselling qualiofications get put to use in my job ;)

I guess my main issues are the time I have to have off. I can't manage full time - the EDS and dys issues have begun feeding off each other (makes them sound like some kind of monsters!) so especially at this time of year working is exceptionally problematic. Also, I've had difficulty getting an accessible office and convincing occupational health I can work.

Not too sure re: debt. I got a MSc in a subject I can never put into practice because my health prevents me from doing so. I loved doing the course though so I don't usually regret it (though there are times when I think what a waste of money!!!!).

Hope that helps. Brain not quite 100% at mo!

Becca.

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Hi

I didn't get pots until about a year ago so I was lucky to have a Masters degree and three kids before I got sick. I am mom, part time preschool teacher and soccer coach. Teaching wears me out so I can only work 6-10 hours a week. After a day of house stuff and kid stuff I am usually pretty wiped. I try to nap when the kids are at school.

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I'm a midwife!!

It was actually during my midwifery finals that I first collapsed and ended up in hospital for nearly 4 months after continouos seizures, cardiac arrest, e.t.c. and was finally diagnosed.

It took a fight and a lot of determination to return to my midwifery and indeed at times it has been one constant fight to keep hold of my career but I have done so and intend to keep proving them wrong. ;)

There is only one ward on which i find it impossible to work and this is due to the ergonomics of the ward more than anything, i.e. beds too close together to enable me to get in a chair to the bedside for use when assisting with breastfeeding. I do have my own chair, baby changing station, stool that were provided for me by disabled access at work which all help a great deal in enabling me to get through a shift with as little pain as possible and remain standing!!! There are other restrictions to do with hours that are placed upon me by occupational health but these are for my benefit and stop managers trying to constantly push you too hard.

My main battle has been trying to gain understanding and prove that I am fit too work and am not a complete freak as some seem to think ( Yes it's quite sad that particularly colleagues with a medical background who should know better can still treat you this way).

At the end of the day it's being able to maintain this form of independence that keeps me sane and I consider myself so lucky that I am able to do this. I admit that the majority of times life does just consist of work and bed but it's worth it.

Good luck to you for the rest of your studies and hopeful future career.

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Hi all!

Thanks for your responses! It was a help to see what all everyone is doing!

I have to say that you all have a lot of interesting and fun sounding jobs! I am jealous!

I agree that I think that if you enjoy what you are learning grad school should be worth it! I just wish I felt that way all the time now, trying to muddle through everything. I just hate the thought of all this education and then possibly graduating and then not being able to practice because of the physical demands of the job etc.

Good luck everyone! (I should probably do my studying and assmt. now... I am a big procrastinator!) :P

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cardiac technician. :) but more specifically non-invasive electrophysiology technician. I hook patients up to ecgs, holter and event monitors, and provide transtelephonic services in rhythm interpretation. I also am involved in pacemaker and ICD interrogation and also perform stress tests. i LOVE my job.

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Or even better, Lloppy, they could hook you up with one of those contraptions they use in the theater to make it look like actors are flying, and you could lay down -- but be suspended above the patient -- to do surgery. Until you drop something and it bounces off of them. Scratch that idea.

Amy

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I've never replied before so hopefully I'm doing this right. I am currently a stay at home mom of twin 5 year olds and a 10 year old. To help with income I have a home based business doing jewelry shows. Recently I've had to start sitting when I do the presentation because I get too out of breath trying to stand and talk. I am hoping things get better by the time the twins go to school so that I can get back into my occupational therapy assistant role.

JJH

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It is interesting to read about your careers. I am a partime (that means 9am to 6pm daily in my career) neurologist who does not take call or perform hospital rounds due to POTS. I too was lucky that I had completed my training as a neurologist BEFORE POTS hit me hard. I would never have been able to get through gueling medical school and residency which required MANY nights with NO or little sleep.

I am glad I quickly realized that I don't have a surgeon's personality. Many surgeons stand for long hours without food or going to the bathroom. Even sitting on a stool for hours would make me presyncopalnow. Plus, wearing the surgical masks is hot and makes breathing difficult. Holding the retractors during surgery as a grunt medical student was absolute torchure for me. In retrospect I had very, very mild POTS symptoms before I completed my training which really only manifest itself while standing for hours during surgery. I tried to hide from being selected to help in surgery, not realizing that not everyone felt sick after standing in one spot for hours! I like the suspension idea...haha.

A good area of medicine for a doctor with POTS would be a radiologist or pathologist BUT I think you have to do what you love...if you can physically. A radiologist or pathologist could sit all day.

I can relate to the idea of wanting to be a lifelong student. I loved school until the bootcamp of medical school.

Karyn

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I went to school to be a nurse but hit a "potshole" and realized that was not realistic. I worked as a Unit Secretary in a hospital for a few years until it became so stressful that I was sick more than I was well. I have been unemployed for a year now and I am just a few weeks away from being a Medical Transcriptionist! I am going to work from home with the option of wearing pjs if I feel icky ;)

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We seem to have a lot of people posting who are in the medical field. Do you suppose maybe people in the medical field have an easier time getting diagnosed? Maybe they know which doctors to go to, or hang out with other medical professionals who can tell them that what they are experiencing is NOT normal? Or is it a coincidence? Or maybe the medical field is just that broad?

Amy

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