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Pots-alternative Treatment


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A local chiropractic doctor sent us information that he is using a hyperbaric chamber to treat two of his patients who appear to have pots. He wants to work with me. He feels that the chamber use will help ease a lot of my symptons. It is being used on patients with Chronic Fatigue, Pots, add/adhd, etc.

It's suppose to flush toxins from the body and send more oxygen throughout the body, which should help the pain. ( especially the leg pains from the blood pooling in the legs, etc.)

Has anyone else tried this? Any there any known risks involved? I'm interesting in learning more.

Please advise..We're thinking of trying it. (My daughter is 17 and has been sick since she was 9, she was diagnosed with POTS in 2005)

Paula

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I really dont know much about that, however you mentioned flushing toxins out of the body, and well i get massases (sp?) and those are supposed to also "flush toxins" and they seem to help with my symptoms (for example some it has helped: hand tremors, arm knumbness, migraines) So i dont know about the hyperharic chamber, but i know that this form of getting rid of toxins did help.

Good Luck!

~Mary

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Interesting--a counselor recommended that I look into this treatment some time ago. I didn't know what it was and it sounded a little quacky, and I didn't follow up. But I am somewhat curious to learn more--what is it, and especially if there are any studies that show that it helps ease any symptoms.

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I know that some professional football (soccer) teams use hyperbaric chambers to shorten recovery times after injuries. They have special hyperbaric gym rooms so that the players can work out whilst in the compression chamber.

I've not heard of it being used in POTS but someone has to do the research before it can be published for doctors to read about it.

Let us know if you decide to get involved and whether it has any beneficial effects.

Flop

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i agree with doctorguest. although it sounds very interesting and i would like to learn more about it, i would NOT try if it was recommended by someone who doesn't know me.

maybe you could talk it over with your doctor (who knows you) and ask his/her opinion (if it was me i would want to be sure to know if it could do any harm). when it wouldn't do any harm i might try but with low expectations (that must be because i've experienced that every new med or exercise i've tried wasn't as promising as i hoped it to be :) ).

of course this is just my opinion and you'll have to decide for yourself what would be best for you!

take care, and when you decide to give it a try, please let us know how it goes!

corina :(

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Too much oxygen is toxic. I would avoid the hyperbaric chamber unless there was some real evidence that it would be beneficial for what I have--or failing that, that the treatment is part of a real research protocol, approved by an institutional review board. I certainly don't want to be experimented upon by someone without proper training and no supervision. I'd be willing to be a research subject, but only if real science is being done and if the risks are reasonable.

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Hi.

Do medical doctors get training in the use of oxygen therapies?

The only places I (personally) know about where hyperbaric chambers are used are in the offices of Ph.D. physiologists who specialize in neuro-rehab. They took training from the companies from whom they bought the chambers, not from medical doctors, and then began their own research. They have helped people recover from strokes and other serious difficulties.

I know I am sensitive to barometric drops because of the effects of any oxygen decrease to my brain, so I have been cautious about getting a chamber. I would love being in it, but hate returning to local atmosphere.

OLL

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I've heard of such treatments helping to heal stubborn wounds that won't heal. I don't remember the details, but I met a woman who was undergoing some type of oxygen treatment at Johns Hopkins ( a legitimate place) for wound healing.

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Hi,

I went through a few hyperbaric oxygen treatments a few years ago, although not for pots. For me it was recommended to help with the immune system. I've never heard of it being used for pots, but it would be interesting to see any research supporting this.

Here's what I can tell you about my experience with it -

1 - It was expensive - I think about $60 for a session

2 - I have problems with my ears withstanding pressure and this really aggravated them

3 - Unfortunately I really did not notice any kind of affect on how I felt energy wise. Maybe many more sessions were needed to get to that point - I'm not really sure.

4 - The one benefit I did notice from the sessions is that it cleared my skin up wonderfully, pretty much got rid of any acne I had. And, if I had a cut on my hand, after the session it looked like it had gone through a week of healing - that part was pretty cool.

hope this helps. Good luck with your decision.

Pam

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Old lady lighthead,

Yes, some medical doctors do get training in performing this treatment since it is being used in some hospitals for various reasons, including promoting wound healing and treating the so-called "flesh-eating" bacterial infections. It is also used as a reasearch tool in physiology where both PhDs and MDs work on the IRB-approved protocols - i.e. protocols that have scientific basis and merit.

As Pamyla said, these treatments are expensive and provide a great means of supplemental income to "quacks". Chiropractors are trained to manipulate the spine, not provide treatments where knowledge of physiology, medicine and first aid are critical. Ultimately, it is up to the patient to decide whether they want to proceed with any treatment/procedure, whether offered by MD or non-MD, but it is best to research the procedure and the health care provider extensively before proceeding with something that currently has no scientific evidence.

doctorguest

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Remember the recent mine disasters/fires in WV last year? The one with only one survivor (mental blocking on the name of the mine and the name of the survivor). Didn't hey transfer him to a hospital and use a hyperbaric chamber for him?

I remember thinking that was interesting b/c for the most part I see it being used as a money maker, but this time I saw that they seemed to really think it helped to save his life?

I feel like now a days they are saying use a hyperbaric chamber for everything! Just like saying we all have candida, adrenal fatigue and leaky gut syndrome! lol. If only it were that simple we'd all be better by now!

Emily

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Emily, the hyperbaric treatment is a very legitimate treatment that has been used for decades - for carbon monoxide poisoning and hypoxia, among other things - but unfortunately, it can also be exploited. The one mine survivor was the youngest of the rest and had a collapsed lung, which, as speculated by some, actually protected him against inhaling the poisonous gases. He did undergo the hyperbaric treatment which likely improved his brain oxygenation and perfusion.

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Thank you Doctorguest for pointing out that it is a chiropractitioner who is advocating the hyperbaric treatment. I didn't read the post carefully and assumed it was a POTS physician that had suggested it. Whilst it sounds interesting, it looks like they need a bit more experience in using this type of treatment for POTS.

Once they get further on with the theory and have done some experiments on humans it would be interesting to see what happens in further trials.

Flop

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Chiropractic basic science and physiology training is very similar to medical training, with the obvious exceptions of pharmacology and surgery. Structure (not just the spine) and physiology are functionally bound together as anyone with POTS knows too well. Many DCs have elected to pursue very limited use of professional training or perhaps their state narrows the scope of practice, but others have continued to become board certified in specialties -- from neurology and orthopedics to internal disorders and pediatrics. Chiropractic in 2007 is much more than spinal manipulation. And chiropractors are not quacks.

However, lest I venture too far off topic, your point is well taken, Doctorguest, that in conditions where medical care may be required, it is not appropriate for a chiropractor to assume responsibility for the treatment.

Don't mountain climbers take portable "hyperbags" on long treks in case they get into trouble at low pressure?

OLL

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Ug, Chiropractors may have their place for some people but never did much for me and I NEVER liked that neck cracking and would not allow it.

I thought GOING ON OXYGEN before one "TRULY needs it" is dangerous as well.

I know some car racers have oxygen in their RV's as during racing, carbon monoxide has always been an issue...Especially in the newer aerodependent cars with tiny windows and VERY little room for air to blow thru the car. Also in hot weather, the fumes can build up and if there is an engine problems, drivers often complain of being sick after a race from too much carbon monoxide in their system. Though the drivers have a cool/fresh air hose in their helmets, they can malfunction.

Hyperbaric chambers are VERY LEGIT when used in the proper channels!! Chiropractors who prescribe such stuff should NOT be allowed withOUT an MD to test a pt to make sure it is needed.

I also find it disappointing how many VERY EXPENSIVE Chiro's in my area CLAIM to have CURES for CFS/FM, etc. Puhlease.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

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Chiropractic training is absolutely not similar to medical training. Chiropractors, like all health care providers, do take basic courses in science and physiology, but aside from that, they get no training in general medicine or patient care. Furthermore, having worked in 2 states, I have never met a chiropractor who was board certified in any of the medical subspecialties that you mentioned because qualification to become board certified in a subspecialty requires one to become board eligible first by completing a residency. You may be thinking about D.O. - doctor of osteopathic medicine - completely different from chiropractors - and in the case of DOs, they do go through medical training as MDs, and subsequently qualify for board certification/eligibility of all medical subspecialties.

Having said that, I personally do not believe that chiropractors are quacks, though some of my colleagues think otherwise. However, I do think that those who offer expensive and outrageous treatments (not covered by health insurance, by the way) that have no scientific basis, whether it's a chiropractor, MD, DO, etc., are taking advantage of people in order to make profit.

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I am very sorry that this discussion has become adversarial. I had hoped to smooth out the harsh judgment implied by the use of the word "quacks", but have failed. Everyone has an opinion about what is natural and what is truly "scientific" and I will leave it there. Onward.

Back to hyperbaric oxygen, there is another technique which was pioneered in Russia, I believe. It is called IHT (intermittent hypoxic therapy), or something like that. It has been used to increase a person's ability to utilize oxygen. It might have a place in case management where hyperbaric is not appropriate.

OLL

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From Lilysnick12's mom

Regarding the Mild Hyperbaric Therapy. I have discussed this with our PCP and she is reserching it too. So far she thinks it's worth a try. I'm still unsure.

I went on line and found this website www.hypertc.com. which explains its usage. I have also sent inquires to several of the Association and sites listed to see if they had study info specific to pots. I'll keep you informed if I can get the study info.

At this point we've not made a decision to go ahead and I'm not sure what we'll do.

The chiropractor is a friend of my sister's and we do know him. I'm going to talk to him to see if his training was through the local hospital or the company it was purchased through. He has offered to accept whatever payment the insurance provides or he will do it free of charge if our inurance won't cover it.

I'm planning to contact her Dr at Mayo to see what they advise too.

Thanks for your input.

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