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I can't stand for more than 5 min and cannot walk very far(can't do much exercise). Just wondering if anyone has suggestion about somthing I may be able to do! Thanks Pat

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;) Thanks Rachel and Mary,I am so excited,I just printed the Yaz Eexercises.I am going to start today.How did you learn of these? Doctor? Thanks again, I think this is something I'll be able to handle,Pat
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There is a link to them on the "What Helps" page on DINET. That is where I first heard of the YAZ excercises. I remember being so excited when I found them 3 1/2 years ago because it was something that I could actually do!

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If you have access to a pool and someone that can help you- water can be an excellent resource for low-impact training. I am doing that right now and it feels good to be able to do a little again- it helps a ton.

Carmen

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HI all!! for a few years now I have been using a stability ball for the bulk of my exercise, i sit on it and sometimes bounce. then yesterday i was looking at dr. cheney's cfs site and he said that the best exerise is called bounce back exercise where you sit in this chair that you bounce up and down, like those things babies use, kindof like what i do on the ball, but the ball is SOOOO much chepaer!!

so pat if you can get stability ball and very gradually try sitting and even bouncing possibly, but start slow like 1-5 seconds and gradually work up!

also for the pool, those of you that are afraid of it what about a life vest? that will keep you afloat even if you pass out, but maybe you should still have someone there

ttfn

Madeline

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ok....the former lifeguard/ pool operator/ swim coach/ swim instructor/etc. in me has to add my two cents to the water-related exercise discussion. i'm the first one to advocate the benefits of being in the water, but one should NEVER be around the water alone, even if the picture of health. depending on the situation, someone doesn't necessarily have to be IN the water with you, but there should always be a set of eyes out, more specifically a lifeguard or at the very least someone who is very comfortable in the water him/herself (or could have someone there who was/is within a minute or two).

if a lifevest helps someone be able to get into the water who otherwise wouldn't (b/c of fear, physical impossibility to stay afloat or stand in the water, etc), that's fine, but it is NOT a replacement for having someone else present who can assist. a good/approved life vest will keep you afloat, but if passed out it might not keep your face above the water, which obviously isn't a good thing since most people need to breathe air rather and not water B)

and wearing it while trying to swim/exercise - even a bit - could really be tough b/c of how life vests are designed. life vests are designed to keep someone on top of the water in open water situations so that rescue can occur; they're not very well suited for other purposes. trying to use one can make things rougher on joints & the like and inadvertantly "teaches" movements in the water that then won't work without the vest on. a better physiologic option (depending on what the goals are) for someone who wants some support in the water would be an aqua belt (for upright movement, i.e. water jogging/ walking or just upright movements), water weights (can be used for support rather than resistance), noodles (can be used in SO many ways & allow a lot of flexibility, both in terms of support & exercise/ movement), & kickboards. i'd be happy to be more specific with "how to" info if anyone needs it.

now - back in lifeguard/ pool manager mode - any/all of these things are still designed just as that...assists. there's a fine line between them providing help to do more than you'd otherwise be able to & them providing a false sense of security in terms of being in deeper water than what you can really be in, etc. a good guideline is that to be alone in the water you should have an expectation that you could generally get yourself back to the side of the pool independently without any assists, i.e. if your kickboard/ noodle/ etc "got away from you" you should be able to get yourself to the closest side of the pool. if it's shallow & you can walk there that's great; if it's above your head you should be able to swim there in some way, shape, or form. it doesn't have to look pretty, i.e. it can be doggie paddle if that's your thing!) you don't have to plan on doing this, i.e. if it makes you feel horrible or messes up your hair or would make you loose your contacts or whatever, but you should have some level of thought that if you ABSOLUTELY HAD TO, i.e. it was a matter of life or death, you'd be able to. if you don't think you could, then there should be someone actually in the pool with you, or at the very least someone pretty much sitting right on the side very close to where you are in the water that is watching nothing but you & is ready/willing to be in the water at any moment...not just the "lifeguard on duty".

okay...i know a chunk of my ramblings were a water safety lecture but it's in my blood & i'd rather be a bit of a stickler if it keeps people safer.

;) melissa

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Hi Pat!

I was doing pilates and it was great for me. Because the excersice is in the floor. I have a bicicle that es horizontal and its great. All the excersice that you cad do in the floor or in the bed it can help you. You have you own rate.

Have a nice day! :(

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I also use the Yaz exercises-- found them through a CFIDS link. I was also prescribed water therapy, but therapists said it was not appropriate due to the safety issues as mentioned by Melissa. They would have a group of 4-5 people, not a bad number, but would not allow me in the group with NCS and vestibular balance problems- as they could not provide one on one.

I do use some of the other suggested exercises as tolerated- have the pedal bike that I can use for legs or arms, but don't tolerate it well- wipes me out. Also use the Yoga in Bed DVD, Qi Gong dvd, simple stretches, use my pedometer to track my steps all day.

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