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Heartbroken

Severe brain fog at airports

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Hi all, 

I know that most of us if not all of us experience brain fog, as it is part of Dysautonomia, but I just wonder how do you all react to travelling through different altitudes especially by air? I get the worst brain fog where my brain will not process information appropriately.

I get (Temporary disturbed cognitive functions). My memory will betray me on the simplest things.

I am a complete mess at airports. No wonder if I look suspicious🙄

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@Heartbroken - are you UPRIGHT at airports? I have done 2 overseas air trips since being diagnosed with POTS an I have to use the wheel chair service or else I will faint or seize before even getting on the plane. I would not be able to fly if not for the wheel chair service.  Brain fog is a symptom of not getting enough oxygen to the brain - so it might be from you being upright, stressed and overstimulated. Regarding your questions of different altitudes:  flying itself never affected me negatively - there is lower pressure in the plane that helps to keep BP down as long as I drink enough water. Now once you land - altitude and barometric pressure definitely have an impact on POTS symptoms, so I always give myself time to adjust to the change - no activities or exercise, just drinking fluids and allowing lots of rest. 

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@Heartbroken - my doctor ordered Ativan to take during a flight or any long travel. A low dose may help with the overstimulation???

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I am impressed that you both can manage to fly.  Congratulations!  My neurologist told me if I ever thought I could travel any distance by car or air she would give me IV fluids a day before and a prescription to get them before I would leave wherever.  I don’t know if that would help with the overstimulation or not.  

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@p8d - that is exactly WHY I m able to fly - IV fluids!!!! Was it not for the weekly infusions I would not be able to leave the house at all. And yes - my doc orders extra fluids before the flight, I cannot be away for more than one week and get fluids as soon as I get back. They are a LIFESAVER!!!!!!

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@Pistoldo you get them overseas before the flight back?  I very desperately want to go visit or go to my mother-in-laws funeral (she’s 96 and in better health than me) whenever that is.  She’s in the West Midlands in England and I fear that I won’t get a Dr over there to honor a US script.  Do you suffer from overstimulation?  Do you think that the fluids would help with that?

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@p8d - I have a port, so I can take all of my IV equipment with me - but I did not have to use it since I get weekly infusions and only ever left for 1 week at a time. I take my IV bags and everything I need with me for an emergency and put them in the check-in bags with a prescription from my doc. --- Yes - I do have overstimulation but getting fluids the day before helps. It seems to calm everything down and my Vitals are always at their best after an infusion. Plus when I go overseas I visist with family and have a wheel chair and everything available. I truly do not have to lift a finger when I am there - which is why I do well with the trip.

2 hours ago, p8d said:

 Do you suffer from overstimulation?  Do you think that the fluids would help with that?

Yes - for me having fluids beforehand ALWAYS helped nd I would not be able to travel in ANY FASHION if not for the fluids. . 

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Adding to the data: I do not have problems flying as long as I drink enough water.

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On 6/27/2019 at 7:35 PM, Heartbroken said:

No, I always use the wheel chair service like you.

In my case, it is a combination of things, such as lights, noises, overcrowd and others. 

I am very sympathetic, this is one of my biggest triggers. It sounds like you have sensory overload :-( If I have to go into a crowded noisy area I must wear my noise-cancelling headphones and sunglasses. I usually put on  my favorite music to drown out the crowd sounds. When it's really bad I take 1mg of valium, too. I take low-dose valium to help my vertigo and it also does a great job on reducing triggers like bright lights, vibrations, voices that vibrate your spine, etc. Sensory overload at a busy transportation hub is unavoidable but it can be reduced just by small effort to shield yourself from that environment. If you can arrange it, study the flight schedules to pick quiet-time flights and travel late-night through early-morning to avoid a crush of people.  When you dine out use an app like OpenTable so you can get a reservation in minutes.

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