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gnnmi

Blood Pooling Question/Compression Garments

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I am newly diagnosed with dysautonomia and had a difficult time visiting higher elevation, had to leave early due to weakness, nausea and headache. As I drove to lower elevation I began to sweat buckets. My clothing was soaked. I am taking this all more seriously and looking into compression garments for future trips. How do I know whether to get tops or bottoms? Does blood pool in only one or the other, or both? My. feet swell and turn red and I often feel slightly bloated but am not sure. I also have neuropathy.  Will the compression garments exacerbate it? Thanks.

 

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There are knee-high, thigh-high and hose that is like stockings. Hose that you wear like pantyhose is recommended and easiest to put on, but some people feel too constrained in it. Some people claim they are more comfortable though. Thigh-high are difficult to put on and knee-high are not as effective. Your doctor needs to order the strength - I believe 30-40 is recommended. Then you should get fitted, which they do in any medical supply store. This includes measuring your calves, thighs and hips so you get the right tightness for your size. 

I don't believe that they interfere with neuropathy but check with your doctor. Mostly the compression aides your body in being able to prevent pooling and pushing the blood back up. If your feet swell as you described then most likely they would help you. 

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9 hours ago, gnnmi said:

I am newly diagnosed with dysautonomia and had a difficult time visiting higher elevation, had to leave early due to weakness, nausea and headache. As I drove to lower elevation I began to sweat buckets. My clothing was soaked. I am taking this all more seriously and looking into compression garments for future trips. How do I know whether to get tops or bottoms? Does blood pool in only one or the other, or both? My. feet swell and turn red and I often feel slightly bloated but am not sure. I also have neuropathy.  Will the compression garments exacerbate it? Thanks.

 

Symptoms that one would experience at high altitude include, nausea, headache and fatigue - some suffer from this at a worse extent than others.  Can occur as low as 8,000 feet. There are other more serious symptoms that can be felt when at higher altitudes.   If you have go visiting then ascend slowly, normal recommendation is over a couple of days. If you find that you were breathing faster and more deeply indicates that you went to high altitude too quickly. Adrenaline levels do increase in the early phases of exposure to high altitude, Low hemoglobin blood levels will impact on symptoms.

Compression 30-40 mmHG is considered full compression,  it is effective providing you don't have arterial insufficiency.   Providing you put on the hosiery on in the morning, it should stop you feet from swelling and help with any aches due to the swelling.  Caution is need though with severe neuropathy.  With the loss of that protective sensation, increases risk of hosiery skin damage.   I would recommend discussing with your doctor as full compression may be too high for you.    It would be safe to say that a review by a vascular surgeon or a Doppler assessment to obtain your ankle brachial index (ABI) which will identify if you have any arterial component to your neuropathy.  

 

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2 hours ago, Shepard1 said:

It would be safe to say that a review by a vascular surgeon or a Doppler assessment to obtain your ankle brachial index (ABI) which will identify if you have any arterial component to your neuropathy.  

That would be a sensible precaution but depends a lot on other factors, for example if you are female under 30, non smoker and no family history of early cardiovascular disease, you are unlikely to have arteriopathy. 

If you are male, diabetic, overweight and over say 40 years old, smoke etc it becomes much more of a concern. 

Were you given any specific recommendations regarding compression at the time of dysautonomia diagnosis? They can be expensive to buy so if you can get a prescription it helps. 

I wear class 2 activa knee high stockings underneath, and class 2 waist high sigvaris compression tights over the top. The former help the latter slide on easily and provide a bit extra compression. 

I can understand however that if you live in a warm climate this may not be comfortable or appropriate. 

I personally do not seem to gain much benefit from them, perhaps slightly and they are comfortable so I continue to wear them, however I do not have any swelling or discoloration suggesting pooling, whereas if you do, you may have more to gain. 

B xxx

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I have neuropathy and compression tights or socks do hurt especially if on for some time. I had to wear thigh high after an op recently and I actually found them ok after a day wearing them. I think my body got used to them. I found this surprising and reassuring after trying different kinds quite a few times over the years. 

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16 hours ago, bombsh3ll said:

That would be a sensible precaution but depends a lot on other factors, for example if you are female under 30, non smoker and no family history of early cardiovascular disease, you are unlikely to have arteriopathy. 

If you are male, diabetic, overweight and over say 40 years old, smoke etc it becomes much more of a concern. 

Were you given any specific recommendations regarding compression at the time of dysautonomia diagnosis? They can be expensive to buy so if you can get a prescription it helps. 

I wear class 2 activa knee high stockings underneath, and class 2 waist high sigvaris compression tights over the top. The former help the latter slide on easily and provide a bit extra compression. 

I can understand however that if you live in a warm climate this may not be comfortable or appropriate. 

I personally do not seem to gain much benefit from them, perhaps slightly and they are comfortable so I continue to wear them, however I do not have any swelling or discoloration suggesting pooling, whereas if you do, you may have more to gain. 

B xxx

True, but I have no idea how old the OP is.  Best to ere on the side of precaution.  Worst case scenario with peripheral arterial disease and wearing compression therapy is compressing arteries causing ischemia and digit or limb death.  

I have worn compression waist high, but had to stop as my bladder was being irritated.  

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