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Derek1987

Blood pressure machine that goes on the wrist

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Are they accurate with blood pressure and heart rate? If so, it seems like they would be easier to use. One of my doctors used this kind on me. I forgot what doctor as I'm seeing so many now like I'm sure the rest of you are. 

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I don't think so. One place used them and they were off from my own omron all the time. The best is an old school mercury column sphygmomanometer for BP. There at digital O2/HR monitors that are good for that. Omron makes halfway decent cuff machines. 

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I used to have a wrist one and had a feeling it was quite inaccurate because my readings were so wonky, so I brought it to a docs appointment one time and it was way off!! I definitely trust the upper arm ones more!!

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Having worked as a GP I would strongly advise against the wrist BP monitors, as they are notoriously inaccurate.

It is also not possible to take one's own BP with a traditional sphygmomanometer and stethoscope, and even those when used in clinical practice are to a degree subject to the user's skill (and hearing)!

I would recommend an Omron automated arm cuff BP monitor. Make sure it is correctly placed (the cuff shows you which part lies over the brachial artery), and that you are using the correct size cuff for your arm. 

A skinny adult sometimes requires a small or paediatric cuff, a heavy adult will need a bariatric cuff. Most people can get away with medium. 

B xxx

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13 minutes ago, bombsh3ll said:

It is also not possible to take one's own BP with a traditional sphygmomanometer and stethoscope, and even those when used in clinical practice are to a degree subject to the user's skill (and hearing)!

I have an old fashioned pump-up BP cuff and use it myself, it is quite easy. I adjust the cuff so it easily slides over my arm ( I leave it at that setting so I do not have to readjust every time ). Then I apply the ear plugs to my ears ( of course ), hold the reader in my outstretched arm that rests on a surface, slide the flat part of the stethoscope under the cuff right on the inside of my elbow and with the other hand pump the balloon until it reads 200. Then I slowly release the pressure until I hear the heart beat and until it stops. That is the reading, when the beat starts is the upper number and when it stops is the lower number. It probably would take someone who is not accustomed to this a while but it is absolutely possible, quite easy actually. 

@Derek1987 - as a former RN I am very aware of the inaccurate readings of MOST BP machines as with many patients we had to take manual BP's if the mchine readings were highly abnormal and in most cases the manual readings were different ( but accurate ). I especially do not recommend the wrist type since the BP in lower arm can be quite different since it is further away from the heart and there are often changes in the circulation. If you do not know how to take your own BP - most pharmacies that sell BP readers can teach that to you. Otherwise get a high-quality reader that you apply to the upper arm. Although I used to have one of those and went back to the oldfashioned kind since there were a lot of inconsistencies. 

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I take my own BP manually too. It works well and is very accurate compared to a nurse's readings. The pressure from the cuff holds the stethoscope in place and I don't need to move that arm, it rests on a counter or table.

 

I have almost never had an accurate reading from an automatic BP machine. I find they always read high on me. I had an excellent one and gave it away... the manual readings are the only way to go for my body.

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But if you are pumping/deflating with the other hand instead of sitting at rest, surely the concentration & hand activity would interfere with your reading?

I don't think I'd be able to take mine that way, but I guess if you are consistent in the way you are taking it, you would still notice a deviation from your norm.

B xxx

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Arm placement matters too.  I tested a new Welch Allyn automated arm cuff with my neurologist’s automated one and also manual readings and the readings were 20-50 points higher on the Welch Allyn home machine. These false readings made us think I had severe hypertension when in fact it was modest.  I had been taking unnecessary medication.  Out of 15 readings in the office that day only 1 matched the manual one with a stethoscope.  I also was instructed to keep the arm at chest level and out straight and wait 3-5 minutes before repeating it.  I have discovered that in my case slight variations in arm placement can raise or lower my reading by 10-15 points systolic.  I am now using my Omron arm cuff and will take this to my cardiologist appointment next week to be compared to their readings.  I, too, have heard that the wrist cuffs are inaccurate.

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I suppose I'm not strictly resting for 5 minutes because I pump with the other hand a minute before deflating. The actual deflation doesn't require anything on my cuff, it's just a loosened screw and I let it deflate at the same rate, I don't speed it up or slow it down. So, I don't move at all while I'm taking the reading, just listening. I'm guessing and - hoping - that my BP isn't artificially high from this activity, when I am getting readings I need the low 70s!

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17 minutes ago, RecipeForDisaster said:

I suppose I'm not strictly resting for 5 minutes because I pump with the other hand a minute before deflating. The actual deflation doesn't require anything on my cuff, it's just a loosened screw and I let it deflate at the same rate, I don't speed it up or slow it down. So, I don't move at all while I'm taking the reading, just listening. I'm guessing and - hoping - that my BP isn't artificially high from this activity, when I am getting readings I need the low 70s!

I think if you have your routine down & know what is normal for you, you would be able to detect any deviations from your normal, which is what matters. 

For me, when I am near passing out, I wouldn't have the ability to even try with a manual sphig.

B xxx

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@bombsh3ll -I usually do not wait until the point of passing out before checking my BP - I am very much in tune with my symptoms and know when to check my BP BEFORE I get to that point. I also understand that some people do not have sufficient time to know when they get that bad - I am lucky, I guess. I went from falling out of chairs without even knowing it to taking immediate action at the first sign of feeling bad and have avoided many episodes by doing so ( also thanks to IV fluid therapy ). 

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