Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
stevenautique

Dysautonomia/pots Symptoms With Altitude And Low Humidity

Recommended Posts

Hello

My wife has recently been diagnosed with dysautonomia/POTS. we have been given the opportunity to move to Denver which we all know is at 5000 feet and has a driier climate. We currently live in MN which is humid and at 1000 feet.

We would hate to move and exacerbate her symptoms. It has been difficult to find out much information on altitude and dry air on pots symptoms. Do we have any experience with people living in colorado or other higher/dry climates?

i appreciate your advice and information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't do high altitudes (living below sea level) but can handle a drier climat much better than humidity. Welcome to the forum!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got back from high altitude in PerĂº and I really struggled. I needed a great deal of extra sleep, and had many near faints, and would have fully fainted if I was not so aware my personal signs that it's about to happen. My heart rate stayed in tachycardia, even when lying flat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I visited CO several years ago (I live at sea level). I was OK at 5,000 ft. At 7,000 I noticed an exacerbation of symptoms and I could not tolerate elevation over 10,000. I think however that the body, even someone with POTS, is likely to adjust to elevation eventually. I have read that it takes the body about 1 month to fully adjust to a significantly higher elevation. I think a drier climate could present a longer term problem b/c POTS patients tend to have problems with adequate hydration--it would of course be important to keep up with fluids to avoid relapse or more symptoms.

I think the bottom line is that all of us are different. Does she see a specialist? Perhaps he or she could provide advice too?

How does she do with flying? Cabins are pressurized to the equivalent of around 7,000 ft.

We do have members here from CO and other areas of 5,000 ft + elevation and hopefully some will weigh in!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just spent almost two weeks hiking in Mount Rainier National Park. For lower altitude (3,000-5,000 feet), easy day hikes, I did okay, but struggled going up hills (to be expected, I guess...). Tried do an overnight hike (with 30 lb pack) that started just above 6,000 feet and couldn't get a mile before I had to call it quits or risk passing out and falling down the side of a cliff. Everyone's reaction will be different, but maybe less activity at higher altitudes will keep symptoms at bay?

On another note, I'm also in Minnesota (Eagan). Hi, neighbor (for now)! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should clarify...I was okay at 6000 ft, but at 11500, I was ill. I did manage to still do a little bit each day at high elevation, but I had to move slowly and carefully. As I only stayed a week, I cannot give you an idea of what it would have felt like after adjusting for longer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. Is there any thoughts on the dehydration in a drier climate than those in a more humid envirnment. Is it an issue? how about a drier heat being more comfortable than a humid heat. Is that a factor?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could've been hard to say I've had symptoms for years but crashed last year here in mt I've lived in many cities most on the coast though. If you can afford a visit first I would test the waters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Stevenautique,

I'm curious to know if you made the move to Colorado and how your wife is doing. If you did move to Colorado, did your wife eventually adjust to the elevation? Has she been able to stay hydrated with the dry air? And has her body been able to adjust to the lower level of oxygen in the air? We are considering moving to a high altitude city, and I am looking for information about how high altitude affects people with dysautonomia long term. Thanks for any help or personal stories you can share.

Rachel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had a harder time adjusting to high altitudes for the last several years since I've had POTS symptoms. However, I have not lived at a high altitude since that time. I do adjust eventually, though. It seems to work better if I give myself a buffer zone of several days - i.e. spend several days at 3000-4000, then move up to 7000 (easy to do in AZ!).

The dryness does affect me but I also have Sjogren's. Keeping hydrated itself was not a problem, but I do not have gastropariesis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...