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Bradycardia


andybonse
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Hi,

Last night laid down in bed checked my heart rate and it was 47 BP 114/59, BP is usually this laid down regardless of hr.

I sat up and it went to 61, then laid back down went to 52-55.

I asked a cardiologist and he said its normal?

Worries me a bit lol, I was a little tight chested, short of breath but I get like that all time regardless of hr.

Its deffo not a problem with my heart, its been extensively tested.

Any suggestions?

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Just think its part of autonomic dysfunction as it can affect your heart rate in either direction

I have days where my supine hr is in 50s still goes up to 110 standing. They just worry if your hr is that low and then won't go up as you go up some stairs and exercise, which yours does. When I had holter monitor hr went down to 48 and as high as 136. If your heart as been extensively checked I would just say its part of the autonomic dysfunction.

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I received a pacemaker back in 2009 for sinus bradycardia (not atheletic). Slow rates while awake in 40-50's (during the day). Always maintained solid blood pressures. At the time, we could not determine whether or not or how much of my symptoms were coming from my slow rates or my dysautonomia. I saw some of the elite EP docs at Mayo, Cleveland, etc and it is tough call. If your blood pressure is normal with JUST sinus bradycardia (no other dysrhythmias) they have told me it is unlikely the majority of my symptoms are coming from my slow rates. They would tell me if my rates were in the 30-40s and I was experiencing low BP than we would be having a different conversation. Then, you have to look at your chronotropic response to exercise. If you are stuck at 60 or 70 with exercise or heavy activity that can cause symptoms. Since my pacemaker I have not seen the improvement that I would have liked but in no way has it limited me from doing things that I want to do.

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Hey Andy,

I've been experiencing this the last couple of weeks too. I think it's all the exercise you and I have been doing. What's weird is how suddenly it started. I've been having headaches/feeling lightheaded at the same time. I read that sustained aerobic exercise can lower heart rates 5-25 bpm. Starting a couple weeks ago I started seeing resting heart rates in the 50s, after 8 months or so of exercise biking 32-34 miles a week + some leg weight lifting. Why did it suddenly kick in? Who knows. My walking heart rates have gone way down suddenly too, but its also accompanied by headaches/light headedness. I'm seeing a doctor next week... but the bradychardia scares me too. However, my blood pressure hasn't dropped down, so I do have to say that the exercise is a possibility.

Why did it happen suddenly though? My only theory is that my peripheral neuropathy has gotten a little better and that accompanied with the results of the exercise takes my body some time to adjust too... Who knows, maybe it's the bad before the good.

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I was on r-alpha-lipoid acid but I stopped it about a month ago. I don't take anything specifically for the neuropathy anymore. There was talk with the neurologist about trying l-carnatine, but I'm going to wait until things stabilize again before thinking about it. Generally I'm on a multi, magnesium, vitamin d, and Omega 3.

Best wishes from the US.

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This can be perfectly normal---as in a perfect EKG--for some people with lower beats. But it could also be a sign of other

things so its important to differentiate.

I can only speak from experience. I have this condition myself. I personally believe one time I went "low" due to dehydration. Wonder

if salt is a factor with others?

Googling helps. I came across this link recently The brain gut axis is vitally important to all of us. Understanding how it basically functions is really a study in how our liver protects us. Our liver is the last line of defense before the brain is assaulted. Once the brain is involved , hormonal disruption ensues first with leptin resistance and then cascades to every other hormone in some fashion. Once this occurs the brain loses its control over cellular homeostasis and neolithic diseases become prevalent. We can understand this process dynamically when we look out our VAP profiles.

For more Paleo Diet hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/65534/how-do-you-hack-a-leaky-gut.html#ixzz2rFCANj7Q
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When googling i always correlate all kinds of words and see what comes up

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