Jump to content

Anxiety Invention Idea I've Had For A While


gofl1
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone, I have had an idea floating around for a while regarding anxiety treatment and thought I might finally solicit some feedback. In addition to my pots issues, I have dealt with on and off anxiety for a few years now. Since my anxiety started I have noticed that my symptoms (non pots type stuff) nearly disappear when I am fully distracted. I struggle with my thoughts constantly being directed to my own internal dialogue/sensations, and when I can pull my focus to the external I feel so much better. Getting to my idea, do you think a totally hidden, wearable device that helps to distract you could be effective? Playing a game on my phone or something similar can be helpful, but in many situations particularly when with others, they just aren't an option. They are also easy to pull yourself away from and go back to focusing on your anxious thoughts. This is just a theory at this point, but I feel like a small portable device that gently coaxes you to focus on it rather than the constant hum of anxiety could be a great tool to get you through tough situations and start improving your thought processes. It might also be helpful for other types of rumination/racing thoughts. Would love any feedback.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think that is a very interesting idea. I too do not notice my symptoms as much if I have a lot of distraction that day (unless it is a reallyyyy bad day) and I do think that something like that could help and is worth a try. I mean why not? with all the meds that everyone takes this is something simple to try without crazy unwanted side effects :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's what I was thinking. I got tired of the ssri merry go round (although they did seem to help my heart rate) and started experimenting with cbt techniques to overcome some of my periods of anxiety. I found that a combination of distracting myself to get over the hump of the worst anxiety and then accepting that the sensations I had been experiencing were anxiety based was the most helpful. Distraction just wasn't as easy to accomplish in a lot of situations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Via some means of sensory stimulation. The key will be overcoming sensory adaptation, which is essentially when your brain tunes out a repeated stimulus so it can focus elsewhere (ie. holding an ice cube will be distracting at first, but you quickly stop noticing it).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son went through the program at the Mayo Clinic for kids with POTS or pain. One of the things they were taught to do by occupational therapists was to distract themselves. They had pencils that had moving blocks on them or squishy balls or small line of blocks held by elastic that could be pulled on and manipulated. These distraction devices helped them focus on something other than their symptoms, plus they were small enough things they could take to school with them and use while sitting in class without being disruptive. I bought him a couple of different kinds from Amazon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is sort of what biofeedback can do for some people. For example, I have a hand thermometer and my goal is to get my hand temperature up to 96.0 or higher. I do this through diaphragmatic breathing. I have one I hook up to my finger and a less accurate one that I just put my thumb on. Anyways, if something is bothering me, I notice I can more easily overcome letting it overwhelm me when I am doing my breathing and focusing on raising the number on the thermometer rather than breathing and focusing on how it is impacting my emotions. I think this is sort of what you're describing.

Biofeedback has actually gotten me into meditation which (with the way many people practice it) is about being able to let the thoughts enter your head, and exit without feeling the need to hold on to them, analyze them, think about them further etc. I don't think I would have gotten into meditation if I hadn't seen the benefits of phasing out everything and focusing on my breathing during biofeedback!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I get really bad, I use music. Not what you think though.

I bring up Pandora on my phone, or any music player, put in "one" headphone, and put it on a Spanish rap channel. (I do not speak Spanish) or a music only dubstep/dance heavy beat channel.

This noise, in a language I can not follow, with a beat that often will mimic the heartbeat, distracts me and will NOT let my mind do but two things. What I'm doing AND listen to the music.

It's important though to only use one headphone. Using both will drown out everything around you, put you on the music only and your mind will shut it off and take off in a million directions.

Also, with one headphone, no one can hear it, you can still talk to people, and carry on like normal.

I guess you could use just about any music you wanted but calming classical or ancient music just makes me think of things (bad choice) country music....well you know what happens with country music LOL

That's my idea :-) it works great for me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a very interesting idea Cala. My thinking was trying to recreate something along those lines, but in a way that you could use it any situation where having that earbud in wouldn't really be acceptable (meeting, class, movie theatre, out to dinner etc.). Maybe that is too narrow of a need for a most, but I have found it coming up in my own life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, where I'm from, people have those blasted Bluetooth thingys clamped to their ears and heads 24/7 ha ha ha

Most of the time I can't tell when someone is talking to me or to the random person they are on the phone with, so why not music via Bluetooth?

IF I had money I'd so do exactly that ha ha ha

But I also cheat a bit LOL have really long hair so hiding my earbud isn't even a concern for me, the majority of the people around me don't even notice it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Distraction/keeping busy is a great idea. I think there are some CDs out there with the voice concept. I tried a couple of them (including one with subliminal messages!) but didn't have much luck.

I don't have clinical anxiety but meditation has been great for me in reducing worry. You focus on the present moment/nothing so that you are not worrying about the past or the future. Your worry will never go away, but you can greatly reduce it. It's very liberating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing I read about was keeping a rubber band on your wrist and snapping it when you start getting anxious. It seems to work, but I don't like the red lines it leaves on my wrist. I did this a couple weeks ago when I had to attend a team-building meeting at work. Interestingly, the HR lady conducting the meeting also had a rubber band around her wrist that she kept messing with during the meeting! So it's a good distraction for anyone with anxiety.

When I start feeling like I'm losing it at work, I try the pressure point tricks. Try holding your wrist with your opposite hand, with you thumb and middle finger meeting over your pulse. Breathe slowly and evenly. Rubbing the base of my head and top of neck also helps massage another pressure point. This helps me a lot when I've gotten a spell while driving, or when I get dizzy looking at PC monitor for too long.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...