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Sugar Reactions


PackersFan
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I'm well aware of the dangers of sugar and dysautonomia. My question is the delay of the reaction. Is it normal to eat something sugary ( candy, chocolate, Starbucks drink) and not feel crummy until hours later and maybe not even until the next day?

I feel faint, panicky, imbalanced, and overall just out of it.

Also, can consuming sugar cause someone with dysautonomia to have a drop in blood pressure?

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I gave up sugar several years ago. Lost 60 pounds when I did and it helped me a lot. When I do consume sugar now, if it's very much at all, it has a time delay reaction, my blood sugar plummets in a couple of hours and my blood pressure goes right along with it. Takes me days to get it all back in line again.

I assume my body is dumping insulin out on me like a fire hose LOL

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On the flipside, I become more symptomatic when my sugar drops, which I understand is basically hypoglycemia. I've heard that lowering sugar is good for POTS so I tried it once and yeah, never felt so bad. It isn't the primary cause of my symptoms but for me it doesn't help at all.

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I frequently have a reaction to simple sugars but it's usually a faster onset than you are describing. It's usually within minutes that I'm having palpitations and tachycardia etc. Ironically when I'm in a relapse I find I frequently crave more carbs and simple sugars which don't tempt me at all usually.

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I never knew I can react so badly to sugars until I had intravenous dextrose (part of my IVIG treatment). The first time around my HR spiked from 80's to 140's within seconds. I had some sort of a "rush" accompanying the tachycardia every time the sugar hit my blood stream, but my nurses dismissed my symptoms. If the infusion rate is lower, I seem to tolerate things better. Foods don't affect me in the same way, and I doubt I ever had a delayed reaction to sugar.

Have you ever seen an endocrinologist, or had any blood sugar tests?

Alex

Edited by Alex
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Packers

I was sent to a metabolic geneticist because I was occasionally (not always) spiking fasting diabetic blood sugars the day after eating too many carbohydrates - my endocrinologist had thought I might have a genetic metabolic disease. I'm sure there are quite a few conditions that can cause a delayed reaction to carbohydrates but, for me, the geneticist thought it was due to a rare neuromuscular disease that sees sudden changes in potassium levels brought on by (among other things) eating too many carbohydrates the day before.

Good luck with finding your own answers.

Dianne

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I know Rich, but I am not a diabetic, I have no issues tolerating sugar whatsoever. Either way, the brand of IVIG I get - Gamunex contains no sugar- it's the dextrose I get pre-IVIG to get the infusion started that gets me in trouble. Also, I don't exactly have a choice over the brand of IVIG I receive. I am fortunate enough to be getting this treatment to begin with :)

Alex

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Rich,

that is a question I'll be asking the nurses on Wed :)

Apparently this is "standard procedure" where I get my infusions. I've seen several other patients receiving IVIG there and we're all getting the exact same thing.

Alex

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There is a clear cut connection between my sugars and my POTS. I do not know what that connection is. When my sugar is low it increases the "adrenaline feeling" or "mountain lion in the room" feeling. I developed DM at about the same time as POTS 4 years ago. I have not been able to find a form of LADA or MODY that matches but am skinny, so it may not be normal Type 2. I also have been diagnosed by biopsy with an Electron Transport Chain Complex 3 disorder (Mitochondrial) so it may be a mitochondrial DM. It is tricky though because lack of sugar, or energy, to the cell also revs up the body's fight or flight system immediately. Is the low energy to the cell causing the increase adrenaline and resulting feeling or is the increase adrenaline causing decreased insulin via alpha receptors to the pancreas, causing decrease in insulin and less energy to the cell. I suspect the former. Remember that it is not the sugar in the blood that causes your body's reaction, it is sugar in the cell, and in DM they are not matching. (i.e sugar in blood can go high because it is unable to enter the cell) (Also, I would note that it is the sugar in the cell that causes the damage to your Pancreas, Eyes, Heart, Vasculature, Nervous System and Kidney.) Thus the body still thinks it needs more energy. I apologize as this was not really carefully written, and not incredibly clear, and is also complex, but there are those on this site that I believe will follow the general idea.

I utilize a low carb diet and run to help both the POTS and the DM.

I have not been around in a while due to work. Things improved with the running, and have remained fairly unchanged since (better but not well.)

best wishes to all,

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