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I've heard of possible genetic links with POTS before, but had dismissed it in my case as the rest of my family are reasonably healthy (except my sister has ITP, which seems completely unrelated).

This week, however, I've been wondering. My nan, who is the grand old age of 91, has had Parkinson's Disease for many years. She was rushed into hospital this week as her Parkinsons had worsened, and she's been told she has a severe sodium deficiency. This in itself made me wonder, but then they briefly thought that she might have Addison's Disease. I was told a year before my POTS diagnosis, that they were pretty sure what I had was Addisons. Further tests ruled this out, as they have now done with my Nan too. She doesn't seem to have POTS symptoms, other than those that also correlate with an ageing body, but the link is interesting nevertheless.

Thankfully, the docs are very hopeful that once they've sorted the sodium out, she will be back to her old self :) (and partying much more than me!) :lol:

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I think there is genetic connections. Much research thinking there is a connection to dopamine levels and that's the problem with Parkinson's.

Issues with sodium - seems to play a part with POTS and maybe the sodium channels - questions about that. Of course, there are many of us with abnormal kidney function and that has yet to be explained reasons. The extremes in blood pressure can be one explanation - but, what causes this in the first place?

Issie

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There does seem to be a genetic link with POTS. My daughter was recently diagnosed with it as well. My POTS neuro says it tends to run in families.

That said, it's not uncommon for elderly people to have electrolyte imbalances and have their sodium, potassium etc get out of whack. We saw it all the time in the hospital where I worked. Don't think that's necessarily POTS related however. Frequently it was due to their diet or not drinking enough water, or they'd get a virus or UTI and stop eating or they'd only eat one or two things all the time and nothing else or...... Once they'd get them balanced back out and back on a normal diet they were fine. It wasn't usually an ongoing problem like POTS.

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Hi Amber,

Parkinson's disease includes autonomic dysfunction in it's later stages, so you may well find quite a few symptoms in common with her. My specialist doc said that the odd thing about dysautonomia in my case, is that it would be an expected collection of symptoms in someone with later stage MS or Parkinsons, but I have no obvious disease to cause it.
Try asking your rellies about people further back in your line, aunties, uncles and cousins. Lots of people on here have turned up interesting facts about their family health connections.

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