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Any Nurses Or People That Work On Their Feet All Day Still Working?


tpapik
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Hey! I am a nurse- just diagnosed in november im trying to keep my job at least part time (40 hours a week) and would like to go back full time, so just wondering if there are any other nurses out there or any other people that have POTS and works on their feet all day?

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I was able to go back towork full time after severe disability for about a year. I am not on my feet all day, most days. However, recently I have added a part-time job--I teach violin privately and have 8 students. So after 8 hrs of working I am standing for at least 1 hr 3 nights a week teaching. Anyway, it is possible to greatly improve, but I do understand that nursing can be a very physically tiring job.

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I went back to work about 3 weeks ago. I work 20 hours a week, 8 hour shifts. I have tried to incorporate the chair more often. I work in Endoscopy so I work in the pre-op and recovery area. I use to never sit down....I don't think I even noticed that we have tons of stools around the unit. I try to use it when starting an IV or asking questions. I am still trying to figure it all out. Taking it one day at a time. I don't want to lose my job either.

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Nursing school is like military boot camp. If you have dysautonomia and going to nursing school. Your inspiring! I am a male nurse but it took my wife who is a nurse to figure out what was wrong with me before the docs could. She is a beautiful well-educated women minus the POTS.

I am not working right now but many out there are able to work. Many things you can do with your nursing license that doesn't require you to be on your feet all day if it becomes a problem. I was sharing this with another nurse on this forum. Even if you stop working, which I hope will never be the case for you only when you decide to retire, but keep paying your renewal fees. Don't let your license expire.

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One health risk with being a nurse is shift work. It really messes with your hormones, starting with melatonin and going on to sex hormones and such. There are some alarming studies on rates of breast cancer and so forth in night shift workers.

Also it can be quite a hard job, long hours, exposure to bugs, harder to take time off to rest, and a relatively high chance that you're also raising a family. ME is meant to be particularly prevalent in nurses, teachers and farmers, and ME often overlaps with POTS.

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I am (was) a nurse, but haven't been able to work for the past 2 yrs. I am truly convinced something in hospitals is making us sick (cleaning supplies, patients not being honest about their history, etc). I have known too many of us getting tumors & other debilitating illnesses in our 30s.

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I was a nurse and have been out of work now for almost 2 years and still haven't seen any permanent improvement...

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Not a nurse but worked in a hospital as a physical therapist. Haven't been able to work for the past year though. Would love to get back to it. I miss it a lot.

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