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Hospital


ukwildcat
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Just wondering??? Many of you say you go to hospital. My very first cardiologist, I went to, said he couldnt say what was wrong with me unless he caught an event. I asked him if I should go to ER next time I was having an episode. He said I would be wasting everyones time. Since that, I never went no matter how many times I passed out in a day, what I hurt when I pass out, or how bad an episode is. No matter how hard husband pleads. Just wondering why people go to hospital and if it helps when they go??

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I think I have been three or four times. I go when I'm up for over two days straight with nausea. They give me this drink it's maalox mixed with a numbing agent and it numbs my whole GI tract so I don't feel anything. Then I usually just get sent home and sleep for hours. Besides that drink they really don't help much...

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I would have to agree that the ER is not a good place to get a diagnosis. They'll check your vitals and send you home if you're not dying.

It's helped me mentally feel better, knowing the chances of death were slim being in the ER. Past that it costs an arm and a leg and the discharge diagnosis was more annoying than helpful - with recommendation to follow up with my Cardiologist.

It sounds like you've had another Cardiologist and have at least been to the ER once in the past before the first told you that? I hope you can find out what's going on! Find a new doctor if they're not willing to work with you...

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When I got sick, my symptoms were so intense, horrible gi pain and lost 35 lbs, severe anxiety, brain fog, however what sent me to the er several times was the caridac symptoms. Ekgs were always normal but the last time I went I was had just given up on finding out what was wrong and collapsed at work. When I went to er my bp was 68/37 and hr was in the 180s. The doc couldnt explain it so he admitted me. THANK GOD! someone finally caught something significant. They sent me by ambulance to another cardiac hospital and then noticed my cardiac enzymes were up and run me threw a lot of tests. FInally getting to my diagnosis of POTS and finally getting meds. I did have afib and some other discoveries that primary care should have caught (hypokalmia) so I am sooo glad I went that day.

I have noticed that on every trip to the er they gave me fluids always assuming my symptoms were from dehydration (even though I assured them I wasnt) which always gave me a day or two of relief from some symptoms. I see alot of Potsies get iv fluids to help. I know when I was admitted, Id be stable and they try to get me off the iv fluids and I would crash within an hour.

I think if any doc tells you to ignore your gut instincts and pain, thats cause for concern, there should be a balance there.

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Thank you for posting this question ukwildcat, After a very bad day this week, could only lie flat and had bad chest pain, leg pain and dizziness all day, i was feeling too weak to get up to get BP monitor, couldnt move and didint know whether it would have been worth my while to go to A & E or not. My POTS doctor also told me all i could do was wait it out the last time i asked her should i go to the hospital too, but you get to the point and think why the **** should i have to wait it out!! im looking forward to seeing the responses to this one!!! thanks again for posting

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I have taken my son a few times to the ER. He was always sent home because his vitals were in range and he was not dehydrated. It's a horrible sight to see your son rolling in pain and they say it's just all in his head. However, I did meet an ER doctor that did give some sound advice about a year ago. He understood that POTS was unpredicatable. His advice was if you could tolerate the symptoms at home, than don't come to the emergency room. He was right. It's better if you can find a doctor with a nurse line that will you back. Sometimes just kind words and a listening ear can be more encouraging. Hope this helps.

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In the past four years, we have taken my son to the ER twice. The first time his temperature was 93 degrees and he was so nauseated that if he just turned his head he would throw up. They kept him overnight to stablize his temp and gave him an IV with Ativan that took the edge off the nausea. Now when his temperature drops, we just wrap him in blankets since that's all they could do for him.

The second trip was when we were on vacation. He was having severe chest pain that was radiating into his back. It was the worst pain he had ever experienced in his life. He had gotten sunburned and stung by a jelly fish a couple of days before the episode. The doctor said it was probably to much for his system to handle. They gave him a shot of prednisone and it all calmed down within 30 minutes.

So the two trips we have made were both beneficial. They didn't think we were wasting their time.

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We have been to the ER probably 5 times in 16 months (at first because she had such severe symptoms and we didn't know it was POTS and the other visits were because of interactions to drugs that the doctors have prescribed for my daughter). At this point, we have pretty much stopped going to the ER because they usually just give her an IV of saline and watch her for 4 hours and then send her home.

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I go to the ER when I am so dehydrated, I cannot hope to recover without IV fluids. If I need more than a couple of liters of fluid and don't quickly re-group, I am admitted for a few days. I also have to go now anytime I run a fever over 100.5 oral since I have a central IV line (permcath) and I could easily get an overwhelming systemic infection -

I can pretty much stay home during big flare-ups - I have an arsenal of medications for just about any symptom. It is the IV fluids that I can no longer administer to myself at home due to the central lines and possibility of infections.

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I went to the ER when I first got my symptoms and was actually admitted so they could find out what was wrong with me. This allowed me to free myself from the initial anxiety diagnosis I was given and get diagnosed by an EP who was on call and worked at Heart Institute in same building as hospital I was in. Now, I just go if my HR won't come down at all and is really elevated (so I can get IV fluids) or have other rhythm issues. Otherwise I ride out the symptoms at home.

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