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Brain Structure And Hypermobility


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Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Brain structure and joint hypermobility: relevance to the expression of psychiatric symptoms.

Eccles JA, Beacher FD, Gray MA, Jones CL, Minati L, Harrison NA, Critchley HD.

Source

Brighton and Sussex Medical School, and Sussex Partnership National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, Sussex Education Centre, Hove.

Abstract

Joint hypermobility is overrepresented among people with anxiety and can be associated with abnormal autonomic reactivity. We tested for associations between regional cerebral grey matter and hypermobility in 72 healthy volunteers using voxel-based morphometry of structural brain scans. Strikingly, bilateral amygdala volume distinguished those with from those without hypermobility. The hypermobility group scored higher for interoceptive sensitivity yet were not significantly more anxious. Our findings specifically link hypermobility to the structural integrity of a brain centre implicated in normal and abnormal emotions and physiological responses. Our observations endorse hypermobility as a multisystem phenotype and suggest potential mechanisms mediating clinical vulnerability to neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID: 22539777

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Whoa, Katie hold the door - What??? does this mean for us with EDS. Maybe, we're just more sensitive souls!!! Ha!Ha! Diamondcut - I don't think we're either insane or unstable. Maybe we're just more sensitive emotionally and physically too.

I'll tell a about a theory that a doctor in New York has about some people. The book is entitled "The Yellow Canary". He feels that there are some people that are more sensitive than others and sense more things in their bodies and the universe. He compares these people to the yellow canary that is taken down into the mines to sense bad air for the men who would die if they stayed in there. Instead, if the bird dies, then the men know to get out of there. This doctor feels that there are people that sense things more acutely than others. Like bad air or bad food or poisons in things. Not only sensing things in our environment - like barometric pressure and air quality. But, also we may sense things going on in our body - things other people ignore and don't seem to even notice. This doctor doesn't feel like this is a bad thing - but, maybe a good thing - although we may be hyper sensitive and it's hard to deal with. Maybe, we're more perfect and the rest of the world is lacking this acuity - we might would get out of the mine and the others might stay in there and die. So............maybe we're all just a little yellow canary. Tweet, Tweet!!!

Issie

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That post you just wrote Issie did make me smile. I think you are right about us being in tune with our bodies. I have an auntie who will not even look at her own x-ray at the dentist because she "doesnt want to know". Almost scared about whats going on in her own body.

How are you going Issie with the clonidine? Have any side effects eased for you?

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I think it is promising that they are looking at how people with joint hypermobility (connective tissue disease and/or variations) have variations in the structure of the brain. Studying this could lead to a greater understanding of how connective tissue disease contributes to our autonomic dysfunction. Knowledge is power...that could lead to better treatment and control of symptoms even if there would be no cure. Any additional understanding of the anatomy and physiology of dysautonomia is going to always be a step in the right direction.

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Yeah, that's true. At least they are finding that the anatomy of the brains between normal people and EDS people - looks different. Another determining factor for having the problem. Maybe this will be the determining factor for EDS III or now called Hypermobility Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (HEDS) - since they can't do genetic testing for it.

Issie

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How are you going Issie with the clonidine? Have any side effects eased for you?

I got to the point with it that I was starting to go into a depression with it. It was making me too tired and dizzy. Yesterday I took only 1/8 of a pill and believe it or not - that was enough. I'm so super sensitive to things. We'll see how it goes today. Thanks for asking.

Issie

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