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weights/chinups - then pots


ramakentesh
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since i have been feeling better, i decided one day - probably stupidly - to do some weights - i did some weights and then some chin ups.

then next day i had the worst orthostatic intolerance ive had for ages - dizzy, weird vision, floating feeling, feeling out of it.

I improved, then tried it again - same response the next...

I wonder why this could be? Other exercise no longer gives me this problem.

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Guest tearose

Well rama, I would suppose if my body responded like that, I would back off for a bit. Either stop altogether with the weights for another week or two OR use lighter weights, or fewer reps!

Slow and steady, remember we do not have predictable reactions, tearose

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I don't know why you would have a problem the next day? Are you OK while doing the weights?

I was regularily going to a gym a few years ago and found I would sometimes get symtomatic during the weight lifting. I thought it might be because I wasn't breathing correctly. Also your BP can go up initially with weights. I brought my BP cuff to the gym and was shocked at how high my BP was right after doing a set.

Maybe try lighter weights or less reps.

I've stopped doing upper body weights and now do pushups instead. Seems to cause less problems.

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The following excerpt is from an article titled Exercise and Hypertension by the American Council on Exercise

Endurance activities such as walking, swimming, cycling and low-impact aerobics should be the core of the exercise program. Exercises that include an intense isometric component that can cause extreme and adverse fluctuations in blood pressure should be avoided.

As aerobic conditioning improves, add low resistance, high repetition weight training. Circuit training is preferred over free weights. During weight training, holding one's breath should be avoided because it can result in large fluctuations in blood pressure and increase the potential of passing out or, in some individuals, possibly result in life threatening events such as abnormal heart rhythms.

http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/fitfact....cfm?itemid=110

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Ditto--chin-ups and weight-lifting are probably not the best exercises for you right now. I have also gotten flare-ups following strenuous activity that involves my upper body. Try brisk walking, yoga or other floor exercises for now. Gentle weight-lifting (using small weights) may be beneficial. Hopefully in time you can get back to chin-ups and weight-lifting that you have been able to do in the past.

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Hi,

This I know because of my past life. Never do any exercise over your head unless you are lying down. You can use weights on the floor mat etc. Raising your arms makes your BP rise/fall. The best exercise for us is circuit training, ending up on the floor to stretch for 10 min. on purpose!!! That way the blood floew is able to get back to its "home" Mieiam

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The following excerpt is from an article titled Exercise and Hypertension by the American Council on Exercise

Endurance activities such as walking, swimming, cycling and low-impact aerobics should be the core of the exercise program. Exercises that include an intense isometric component that can cause extreme and adverse fluctuations in blood pressure should be avoided.

As aerobic conditioning improves, add low resistance, high repetition weight training. Circuit training is preferred over free weights. During weight training, holding one's breath should be avoided because it can result in large fluctuations in blood pressure and increase the potential of passing out or, in some individuals, possibly result in life threatening events such as abnormal heart rhythms.

http://www.acefitness.org/fitfacts/fitfact....cfm?itemid=110

Holding your breath can happen in weight lifting. I think that's what caused a lot of my problems. I think I must have been holding my breath and not realizing it.

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exercise intolerance is a common symptoms of ans dysfunction. For many of us, it can set of symptoms either immediately or in the day or so that follows.

I do my exercises lying down. Some also report doing well with a recumbant exercise bicycle--it has you in a somewhat reclined position. I did pilates when I was feeling better and have a "pilates performer" that I got used--almost everything is done lying down. Some also report doing well with yoga.

Nina

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I'm not sure if any of you have tried the Total gym? I just bought one b/c I usually do free weights, which I find is difficult b/c I have to be standing up. With this you can lay completely flat and go at your own pace and weight...or use no weight on bad days and just use it for stretching... You never have to stand up which I think might help keep BP more stable.

I'll let you know how it goes as I use it. I know that going very slow with any excersise and limiting it to when you are up to it is always key for me. Good Luck :)

Just a thought.

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