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Gallbladder And Ans Dysfunction


firewatcher
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I was looking for some articles for a friend and found this from 1993. It makes it pretty clear why many of us have had gallbladder issues!

Abnormal gallbladder function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

Am J Gastroenterol. 1993 Sep;88(9):1387-90.

Sood GK, Baijal SS, Lahoti D, Broor SL.

Source

Department of Gastroenterology, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Abstract

Abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system function and cholecystokinin release have been described in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Because the autonomic nervous system and cholecystokinin have an important role in the normal functioning of the gallbladder, we studied gallbladder contraction in response to a meal, using real time ultrasonography in irritable bowel syndrome patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 15). The following parameters were studied: 1) fasting gallbladder volume, 2) residual volume after maximal contraction and at the end of 2 h, 3) maximum percent of gallbladder emptied, and 4) the time taken for maximal contraction. Fasting gallbladder volume (26.21 +/- 1.81 ml vs 15.21 +/- 1.63 ml, p < 0.001), and residual volume after maximal contraction (14.2 +/- 1.69 ml vs. 5.86 +/- 0.98 ml, p < 0.001) and at the end of 2 h (18.81 +/- 1.73 ml vs. 11.65 +/- 1.45 ml, p < 0.01) were significantly higher in the patient group, compared with controls. The maximum emptying was less (49.55 +/- 2.75% vs. 63.98 +/- 4.55%, p < 0.01) and the time taken for maximal contraction (59.25 +/- 3.8 min vs. 42.33 +/- 2.04 min, p < 0.001) was longer in the patient group than in the controls. Based on these observations, we conclude that patients with irritable bowel syndrome have significant abnormalities of gallbladder motor function.

PMID:8362836

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VERY interesting, Jennifer. MY GB started going bad back in my 20's and I had VERY severe IBS-D at that time. Makes sense. I KNEW there was a dysautonomia connection as so many of us had issues very young w/o other risk factors.

Thanks for the info-

Julie

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Very interesting article. I feel having my gallbladder removed in 2005 was the underlying cause of my dysautonomia. Prior to that I lived a normal life and once it was removed, I was never the same after that. I think they should do a study on us with gallbladders removed and dysautonomia.:)

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I had mine removed at age 40. I began having bile-diarrhea right after that. I caught me by surprise while shopping, and for the 11 years since, I cannot leave my house before 11 a.m. I learned right away that a coke first thing in the morning would cause me to run to the bathroom. It was a good thing and a bad thing. It was bad in that it was a coke full of sugar! But, it was good in that it would cause the episode and the rest of the day was then pretty "safe" from surprise bathroom trips.

I have no clue, but maybe the bile changed the flora of the intestine. I don't drink cokes anymore, but if I drink tea that has just a tad bit too much sugar, I'll definitely have to go to the bathroom.

I've had 3 immediate family members also have theirs out since mine, and none had the diarrhea like me.

My point is, I've had alot of years of bile-induced diarrhea. So, did that play into the POTS? Did anyone here have this issue after their gall bladder was removed? I get bad intestinal bloating, so becoming constipated would be awful for me.

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Interesting! Thanks for sharing! I had my gall bladder out when I was 20. My problems started at 17 years old. I could hardly eat anything for a few years. I had every stomach GI test done and nothing showed up. However when they finally took out my gall bladder it was covered in scar tissue. Everyone kept saying I was too young to have gb problems and that I didn't fit the stereotype because I was not overweight.

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Sue 1234- Have you been diagnosed with "dumping syndrome?" I know that is fairly common after gallbladder surgery when you ingest sugary foods.

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Chaos, no, nobody addressed the situation. Now that I don't drink hardly any sugar, it isn't an issue anymore. But, I did learn about it after-the-fact, and realize someone should have at least offered me the bile-binding medicine(I probably wouldn't have tolerated it anyway!!).

Hmm, dumping syndrome AND gastroparesis at the same time. How is someone supposed to eat for that??

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I had my gallbladder removed last year because it was not working and I was having pain. My neuro endocrinologist told me that it was not working due to the dysautonomia which causes it to be sluggish along with other things like your appendix.In reality, it probably did not have to be removed but they thought it was causing other symptoms. I developed gastroparesis shortly after and could not eat for 2 months. Also contracted C.diff at the hospital during the gallbladder removal which probably cured my gastroparesis but was ridiculously hard to get rid of and caused me to be hypovolemic and hospitalized. Currently (a year later), I suffer from bile salt diarrhea and sharp intestinal pains. I think its from having the gallbladder removed and I took that binding stuff but it did not seem to help much. I think there is def a connection between dysautonomia and gall bladder dysfunction.

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I see the neuroendocrinologist for my autonomic neuropathy issues. He was the one that actually diagnosed me after numerous testing. I did the cannes test (sp?) where you hold your breathe, breathe normal, and also tests valsava maneuver. He also does neurological tests (ex: can you feel this, and strengths), and blood pressure/pulse lying down, sitting, and standing. He is the only one that is helpful for the autonomic neuropathy but it seems he spends more time on research then actual solutions. He also takes blood and I dont know what tests he runs on it but he seems to think my autonomic neuropathy is not auto immune but caused by a virus cause of its sudden onset. I would say to see a neuro-endocrinologist if you think it would be helpful because I dont know what other doctors you go to for this unless you're by mayo or vanderbuilt. In the beginning, he also tested me for heavy metal poisoning, neurofibromatosis, adrenal tumors, etc... so I would say they are good at ruling stuff out.

Edited by corina
removed unnecessary quoting
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The reason I ask is there is an excellent neuro-endo just a few hours from me. People with tumors fly from around the country to see him. I do have small tumors on each adrenal that get regular monitoring, and I have endocrine symptoms galore. I just have been waiting for my other doctors to finish what they were doing. I think I'll go ahead and give him a try. Maybe he can sort out the symptoms that seem to mimic so many things.

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