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I was diagnosed with dysautonomia in 2005. I was put on lexapro and metaprolol(now coreg in place of metaprolol). The meds helped, but they are no cure by any means. I am afraid I am not going to be able to keep a job. I have lots of education, and hate to think I wasted my time. But, I just have days, sometimes weeks I just don't feel good. I am not lazy. Before POTS I was very active, and needed little sleep. I keep thinking I will get better, but I don't think it's gonna happen. How does one go about disability? I am embarrassed to even tell my Dr. I don't think I can work. And can you even get disability for dysautonomia? I was hoping to further my education, but I think I am setting myself up for dissapointment.

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You can, but it's a very difficult thing to prove.

Definintely get your doctors on your side by telling them how debilitating your symptoms are and make sure you only see dr's that are MD's not nurse practicioners - I found out the hard way about my current primary who is a NP and knows my case well; legally her words mean nothing in my SSDI case.

Find a good local social security disability attorney as soon as you quit working and file the day you quit so your benefits will be backdated to that date.

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I was diagnosed with dysautonomia in 2005. I was put on lexapro and metaprolol(now coreg in place of metaprolol). The meds helped, but they are no cure by any means. I am afraid I am not going to be able to keep a job. I have lots of education, and hate to think I wasted my time. But, I just have days, sometimes weeks I just don't feel good. I am not lazy. Before POTS I was very active, and needed little sleep. I keep thinking I will get better, but I don't think it's gonna happen. How does one go about disability? I am embarrassed to even tell my Dr. I don't think I can work. And can you even get disability for dysautonomia? I was hoping to further my education, but I think I am setting myself up for dissapointment.

Are you currently working? Or did you recently quit work? Or are you working but barely hanging on? I think all of this creates the situation from which you spring forward. If you are pretty much at the doctors constantly for one thing or another -- that can be a helpful thing in hindsite.

I'm pretty sure the best scenario is that you are working and have a solid work history that the soc. sec. system can draw from to form your case. They are actually not your enemy but there to help you. Every situation is different....

If you were working and went out of work utilizing your employers disablility program --- and if your state has a disability program that you are using - and you see these things are meeting their 'expiration' time - then it's definitely time to apply - the sooner the better - if you are homebound - you can even apply via a phone call to soc. sec. -- they will provide you with a list of documents and such you need for that phone call - and then you wait for the verdict - your records from doctors are all obtained by soc. sec. and can speak for themselves without an attorney even involved -- a solid case is a solid case...luck and a prayer (or a thousand prayers) some cases are approved straight away.... You can learn a lot just by calling social security and also by reading their website...

Remember too that just because you need it now - you are aided all along the way to give work a try again once benefits are procured....not pressured - but if you wanna try to work you can....then if things don't work out you are given several opportunities to try - without hampering your benefit -- Even if you drop the benefits and work full time again - then fall again - within a time frame you don't have to 'reapply' but rather they re-institute your benefit you had dropped.

Your monetary benefit amount will be better if you shift from that solid full time job into the disability program - rather then you taking lesser and lesser hours, lesser and lesser income, lesser and lesser jobs.... They look at your income history when figuring your benefit amount..

The benefit aside from a cash flow is that 2 years into it you are able to receive Medicare health insurance...the bad part is some states don't allow supplement insurance if you have Medicare and are under age 65... But some insurance is sure better than none.

Once approved you will be put into one of 3 categories I believe - those that are likely to get well in a year or so - someone that will get well in a bit longer time - and those that aren't likely to recover... These categories then dictate the timeframe for your claims 'reviews' ..... so it's prudent to keep up with your health care providers so a paper trail is present of your disability's path of care etc...

Hope this information helps - I don't work for Soc. Sec. so it's not 'gospel' - but this is what I learned from them...maybe give them a call.. blessings to you!

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