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Let's See How Common Gluten Intolerance Is With The Potsies.


  

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I had negative tests, until I was in the hospital in January and the GI doc noticed my IgA (?) was abnormally low, saying that would make any celiac test invalidated. I had recently had a negative endoscopy, but this gastro felt that there was more than enough clinical evidence to warrant genetic testing. Which came back positive. When we factored in huge family history of colon cancer, and the fact that my constant diarrhea, nausea and rapid weight loss all stabilized once I went on a strict gluten free diet, she felt that was enough to base a diagnosis of Celiac disease, especially given my reaction on the two occasion I ate some thing that had hidden gluten or cross contamination. The effect were dramatic! I was so bummed though, because I am absolutely the carb queen, giving up beloved pastries, cakes, and breads is rough! But I have to admit, not wasting away to nothing is a huge motivator!

Sandy

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Most blood tests will come back negative, so everyone who said no should keep that in mind. It is not uncommon. Any positive blood test means you definitely have something going on. A few months trial of GF is definitely warranted. There is a lot of information about this the different types of blood tests and you can search google if you want more information. Here's a post to a celiac forum that is an interesting read.

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/74266-gliadin-iga/

As Sandy said, if you have low IgA or IgG immunoglobulins in your body, then none of the antibodies tests will ever show an elevation because your body cannot produce enough of them. Ironically this is common in Celiac if I remember correctly.

I don't think I have symptoms when I eat gluten, but it could be affecting my nervous system so I just decided to get rid of it. My husband is highly reactive to gluten so I did it mostly for him. You cannot have gluten eaters in the same kitchen as a non-gluten eater. Well you can, but it is extremely difficult to keep cross contamination from occurring. I didn't feel like dealing with all of the hassle. Here's a good blog entry about this problem I found through google. Another really good read for those following or attempting to follow a GF diet.

http://tastyeatsathome.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/kids-in-the-kitchen-cutting-down-cross-contamination-in-a-shared-kitchen-and-molten-chocolate-lava-cake/

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  • 1 month later...

There is a good resource available from the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, Australia that can be mail ordered and delivered on strict elimination diets for food intolerances. They have a website. I decided to go down this path as the blood tests on food intolerances are not conclusive, and I have been told by several doctors that the only way of truly ruling in or out food intolerances is via a strict elimination diet.

I have therefore purchased both the book that explains intolerances and the cooking book that assists with a strict elimination diet. It has easy recipe suggestions for gluten free, dairy free, egg free, soy free, and low chemical diets. I have been told by a dietician that you should do the fructose free diet separately as otherwise the diet is too limiting, but she has had clients that have done both at the same time.

I am going to start the strict elimination diet in a month or two.

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I really don't have many food intolerances( that I know about) except for pineapple and onions. I have tested negative for celiac but am considering a gluten free diet anyway because I heard that generally many people just feel better that way. Is there anyone else out there with out known sensitivities who feels better on a gluten free diet?

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Or, what if it's actually the opposite: Many people that have food intolerances find they develop autoimmune issues? :huh:

Perhaps - but im yet to see convincing evidence of this. its seems more likely that people with autoimmune disease of genetic predisposition to faulty inate immunity.

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I had my blood tested for allergies and while I am not Gluten intolerant, I am allergic to Wheat. Hence, almost everything has wheat in it and I eat a gluten free diet.

Don't know if this helps anyone :blink:

So there are many facets to this puzzle.

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  • 1 month later...

Duodenal biopsy to test for coeliac disease will only show positive if you have been eating gluten regularly for several months before the biopsy. This is because in coeliac disease (not gluten intolerance) the presence of gluten actually damages the wall of the duodenum and it is that damage that is seen under the microscope. If someone with coeliac disease follows a strict gluten free diet and then gas the biopsy they will get a false-negative result.

Flop

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  • 5 weeks later...

I recently had food allergy testing done. I found out that the blood and skin test for allergies are only 95% accurate. I have a known life or death reaction to shrimp and did not test positive to it. I could NOT understand not having positive reactions to allot of the foods tested, because I do react when I eat them. The doctor said that because of the break down of the serums to do the testing, it breaks down the proteins and it isn't in it's true form as when we eat it. So, there are false negatives with allergy testing. Save your money and pay attention to your own reactions. If it bothers you don't eat it. It may be different with tissue biopises - I don't know. But, I didn't test positive for glutten intolerance - but have found that I'm so much better without it. And as Rama said - I have known autoimmune problems and this could play a big part in the reactions. Your autoimmune system attacks things when it shouldn't - this could happen with foods too (or other things - shampoo, creams, etc.). Therefore, the possible mast cell reaction that we've all talked about before. Allergic to nothing with the possiblity to react to everything - and never knowing when or to what, unpredictable.

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  • 1 month later...

Jsyk .. In my celiac support group we have several people who's biopsies were negative for celiac

until their doctors finally got a good biopsy. This problem is well recognized with celiacs ..

When I first learned I had gluten intolerance back in 2005, i was shocked to hear that it was understood that it

takes 11 years to get a celiac diagnosis after the patient shows symptoms.

Any guesses why ? Here.s a clue .. $ ..

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

i have neither but react badly to wheat and wheat derivatives (eg wheat starch). i get the usual allergy symptoms and not sure if its them that trigger my PoTS or something in the wheat. just dont eat it now. but annoyinly- gluten free food isnt necessarily wheat free which makes eating at restaurants even harder cos they dont seem to understand that i cant eat wheat starch but can eat rye and oats........ they assume its all related to gluten. sigh. got really good at reading labels!

fi

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