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Klonopin??


icesktr189
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Can I ask what you are taking it for and why for a few weeks? I would never tell someone not to take their Dr's recommendation, but let me just tell you about my own experience. I was on Klonopin several times a week for about 6 months and became very addicted to it. I had a horrible time trying to get off of it. Every time I tried, I would go into a horrible withdrawal. I finally went off cold turkey (which was a VERY BAD thing to do to) and went into acute withdrawal. It took me years to get rid of the "withdrawal" symptoms and some -even ten years later- never went away. I really hate this class of drugs. I am probably an extreme example of what can happen, but I would just say to you - be careful.

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I want off this drug also. I found a pharmacy that will compound it into liquid. They made 0.5 mg in 1 ml. The plan is to decrease the dose by 0.1 ml each week. So it will take about 2 months to taper down and ween off. The problem is that the tablets do not split well and the dosing is very hard to decrease this way.

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I am getting on celexa and the first couple weeks I will have panic attacks until I get used to the Med. I will only take as needed. Last time I took it only 6 times in 5 months. Thanks for the replies.I will take half a pill. Injustice don't want to be stoned out and I don't let my body grow tolerant by only taking it randomly.I knw the withdrawal is like going to **** and back.

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Klonipin for me is a wonder drug. I was on it for about 8 mths (2 years before diagnosis) and i never had an 'episiode' and i never got 'sick' with my 'unknown illness'. I was born with wravled nerves...... However, they had me on 1mg twice daily and I think that may have been too much for me. The doc decided to stop it suddenly, i didnt know any better at the time, so i stopped it abruptly too..... wish i could sue, cuz the withdrawal took a good year to get through, it was scary, i was direly sick and the depression that followed was a true eye opener for me to know what those who have depression go through, it was deep, long and dark.

I can't take ssris and most meds anyways, they make me really sick..... I do plan to get back on klonopin or at least valium, because i had NO side efffects, except some memory loss, and well, i deal with that every day anyways now.

Yes, it is very addictive, but im ok with it myself knowing i wuld be on it forever. Some docs who slowly taper patients off of klonopin do it with valium, suppose to make it easier and safer.

anyways, i had a great experience and i'll be asking for it soon, but not ready yet.......

good luck

hilbiligrl

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There are many kinds of meds known as benzodiazepines and klonopin is one of these. I was prescribed clonazepam, also called klonopin (and many other names), by a N in July/08, beginning with .25 mg/night. Eventually I needed o.5, then .75 and finally 1 mg/night. I saw a different N in Aug, 2010, for a different reason and happened to mention that I was taking clonazepam but wasn't sleeping much at all. He prescribed zopiclone, also known by many different names, 7.5 mg. at bedtime.

Recently I came to know both of these meds as extremely addictive and just plain not good for us. Then I was angry that these 2 Ns had in reality made me become sddicted to this type of drug. They never explained what they were or what they did. Neither did the druggist. My previous druggist would sit me down to tlk privately and describe everything about any new med.

I tried to take myself off the zoplicone, taking half a pill, 3.82 mg/night. I was fine for 5 nights but by the 6th Ibegan having the weirdest thoughts or whatever they are called. Anyhow, I was confined to a tiny place, surrounded by hundres of others, all shouting commands at me. I know I was aware of this happening because I'd say to myself, "You people don't belong in my life, get out". After saying this to myself several times, I must have dozed off and then it would happen the next night.... and the next. After the 3rd night I clued in and decided to do a search on exactly what zipiclone was and what it did. It was then that I realized I must have been having some sort of withdrawal problems.

The next night I took the 7.5 mg again and decided to see my doctor about a proper program for withdrawal, after almost 2.5 years on benzodiazepine meds. I'm scared of what is to come.

This is the website that gives all manner of info on these very addictive and dangerous meds....dangerous that is if we're not properly informed. I've learned that I'll ask lots of questions from now on. There is a forum we can join here as well.

www.non-benzodiazepines.org.uk/benzodiazepine-forum.html

Take good care everyone.

Mary P

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I know what you mean. The withdrawal from this drug is supposed to be the worst.

The FDA is actually supposed to be issuing a black box warning for it.

The big problem is that everyone eventually hits tolerance. Ugh

Thanks for the replies! I have taken. 5 in the past but this time I will take. 25

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Reading all of this is freaking me out a bit. I just started klonopin 2 wks ago at .25/night and just raised today to 3/4 of a .5 pill. I'm supposed to have been increasing it all along but am going slow because of my sensitivity. Now reading this makes me want to stop before I get any further. I have been on & off of 25 meds in 5 1/2 years because I can never tolerate what I'm prescribed and the *last* thing I think I can handle is yet another med that may screw me up for years to come.

I'm taking it for dizziness from migraine and the Dr doesn't feel he has any other options with me since I can't tolerate gabapentin & topomax scares me (bad side effects). He doesn't want to do cardiac med options b/c of the POTS. What a choice to make... debilitating dizziness or addiction!

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While addiction is frightening, it is not a certainty. Dependence is, but not addiction. A diabetic is dependent on insulin, but not addicted. These drugs do have a purpose and do treat physical problems. Yes, you have to weigh the "how much is this pain effecting my quality of life" versus the dependence, but many of us have come off of klonopin without horror stories and many of us take it without addiction. Only you know your own body, and personality plays a big part in the possibility of addiction.

I take klonopin, and I will continue to take klonopin until my migraines go away. If that is the rest of my life, so be it. This chemical makes it possible for me to live my life without constant pain. Am I addicted, no. Am I dependent, yes.

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Firewatcher, I'm interested in reading your recent post about addiction or dependence.

Actually, I've been wondering if I am truly addicted. Perhaps at this stage I'm dependent. You've made me wonder.

I've had insomnia for at least 30 years and have taken meds other than these. How can one tell if she/he is addicted? I just took for granted I was addicted because of the withdrawal symptoms from zopiclone.

Thanks for anything you can do to answer. I couldn't find anything on the www.

Mary p

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Firewatcher, I'm interested in reading your recent post about addiction or dependence.

Actually, I've been wondering if I am truly addicted. Perhaps at this stage I'm dependent. You've made me wonder.

I've had insomnia for at least 30 years and have taken meds other than these. How can one tell if she/he is addicted? I just took for granted I was addicted because of the withdrawal symptoms from zopiclone.

Thanks for anything you can do to answer. I couldn't find anything on the www.

Mary p

Mary, this is about as good of an explanation as I've found:

Opioids: Addiction vs. Dependence

by Karen Lee Richards, ChronicPainConnection Expert

One of the greatest obstacles chronic pain patients face in their quest for adequate pain relief is the widespread misunderstanding of the difference between physical dependence on a drug and addiction. Many patients, the general public, and sadly even some physicians fear that anyone taking opioid medications on a long-term basis will become addicted. As a result, pain patients are often labeled as “drug seekers” and stigmatized for their use of opioid medications. Worst of all, their pain frequently remains under-treated.

Understanding the Terminology

Before we can adequately discuss this topic, it is important to clearly define the terms we will be using.

Addiction is a neurobiological disease that has genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors. It is characterized by one or more of the following behaviors:

* Poor control over drug use

* Compulsive drug use

* Continued use of a drug despite physical, mental and/or social harm

* A craving for the drug

Physical dependence is the body's adaptation to a particular drug. In other words, the individual's body gets used to receiving regular doses of a certain medication. When the medication is abruptly stopped or the dosage is reduced too quickly, the person will experience withdrawal symptoms. Although we tend to think of opioids when we talk about physical dependence and withdrawal, a number of other drugs not associated with addiction can also result in physical dependence (i.e., antidepressants, beta blockers, corticosteroids, etc.) and can trigger unpleasant withdrawal symptoms if stopped abruptly.

Tolerance is a condition that occurs when the body adapts or gets used to a particular medication, lessening its effectiveness. When that happens, it is necessary to either increase the dosage or switch to another type of medication in order to maintain pain relief.

Pseudoaddiction is a term used to describe patient behaviors that may occur when their pain is not being treated adequately. Patients who are desperate for pain relief may watch the clock until time for their next medication dose and do other things that would normally be considered “drug seeking” behaviors, such as taking medications not prescribed to them, taking illegal drugs, or using deception to obtain medications. The difference between pseudoaddiction and true addiction is that the behaviors stop when the patient's pain is effectively treated.

I developed tolerance to Klonopin and then pseudo-addiction. When I brought it up to my neurologist, he told me to "just up the dose." I thought he was nuts to tell me that and found an acupuncturist that is really helping. I have now come down to .25mg divided into 2 doses daily. I did try to come off of it completely, but the other meds just didn't work as well without it. I could come off, but I am making a quality of life decision. I hope this helps.

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How can one tell if she/he is addicted? I just took for granted I was addicted because of the withdrawal symptoms from zopiclone.

Thanks for anything you can do to answer. I couldn't find anything on the www.

Mary p

Mary-

Do you take drug to function?

Drug addicts function to take drugs as opposed to taking drug to function.

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Sorry I didn't mean to assume that everyone was addicted to it. :( in my experience it was terrible to get off of. I only took it for three months at. 5 mugs. I had night sweats, shaking, and hullicinations.

It also doesn't help that my father is a 20 plus year drug addict to medications. I have seen first hand how medications can destroy lives.

I totally understand that if klonopin can make your quality of life better than itsworth it, but you need to know the side effects :)

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Firewatcher, Thank you for this great info. You took a great deal of time to answer my question and I really appreciate it. I need to feel informed when I see my PCP and now I can.

Reen, Thank you also for your important info. I can tell you that I need to take this med so I can function. Every night I say as I take it, "I need this med to give me a good sleep so I can have a good tomorrow".

Again, I'm grateful to you both,

Mary P

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Thanks everyone for responding to my concerns. I feel a bit better about taking it today, although I am going to bring up the dependence & tolerance issues with my doctor when I see him. Clearly I need something for my dizziness, and would rather keep it at as small a dose as possible. I just wish doctors would be more forthcoming about these potential issues with patients before we get started on meds! A few of my Drs are great that way - but the majority are afraid they'll freak us out. That's where we as a group are different - seems like most of us have been through the ringer with meds and would rather be informed.

firewatcher - thanks so much for all of the information and thoughtfulness about differentiating between the meanings of these terms we all throw around. I've never had an addiction issue through all of the meds I've had to trial, but have had some horrible withdrawals (mostly anti-depressants) because of my body's chemical dependence that seems inevitable and certainly out of my control.

Out of curiosity... how long has it taken you all to notice a difference in your symptoms after starting klonopin? This is week 3 for me and i'm still dizzy all the time. thx :)

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"Out of curiosity... how long has it taken you all to notice a difference in your symptoms after starting klonopin? This is week 3 for me and i'm still dizzy all the time."

Mine was within hours. I felt incredibly better once it was at my peak concentrations (3-4 hours.) I knew exactly when it started wearing off though. If you've taken it for three weeks, I'd think you would see some improvement by now. :huh:

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Wow. I haven't come close to seeing relief... Sounds like im not taking enough. My Rx says to go up to.5 2x/day. didn't know it had such a short 1/2-life. thanks so much guys :)

It actually has a LONG half-life (36 hours) so it should be working. I was up to .75mg a day when my neuro told me to up it. Honestly, I'd think that it would be helping by now. If you decide to come off, taper down slowly and remember that 36 hour half life, it could still be in your system a day and a half after the previous dose.

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I read somewhere that it takes 7 half-lifes of a drug to get to stable levels and also 7 half-lifes for it to be completely out of your system.

Fascinating. It wouldn't surprise me. So by that theory, with a 36-hr half-life it should take 10.5 days for klonopin to get up & working at full effect in someone's system. I just figured out that I'm at 27 days at .25mg. Seeing my prescribing dr next week! Thanks everyone... what would I do without you??

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Thanks everyone for responding to my concerns. I feel a bit better about taking it today, although I am going to bring up the dependence & tolerance issues with my doctor when I see him. Clearly I need something for my dizziness, and would rather keep it at as small a dose as possible. I just wish doctors would be more forthcoming about these potential issues with patients before we get started on meds! A few of my Drs are great that way - but the majority are afraid they'll freak us out. That's where we as a group are different - seems like most of us have been through the ringer with meds and would rather be informed.

firewatcher - thanks so much for all of the information and thoughtfulness about differentiating between the meanings of these terms we all throw around. I've never had an addiction issue through all of the meds I've had to trial, but have had some horrible withdrawals (mostly anti-depressants) because of my body's chemical dependence that seems inevitable and certainly out of my control.

Out of curiosity... how long has it taken you all to notice a difference in your symptoms after starting klonopin? This is week 3 for me and i'm still dizzy all the time. thx :)

Are you on the brand or generic?? I found that when I switched to brand name Klonopin it helped significantly more. I was on Klonopin for years for "panic attacks" that were sooo severe that I thought for sure I would not live through the night. After my ablations I was able to wean off of it and only recently with the return of POTS symptoms have considered going back on it. Well, I started writing that I did not have any dependency issues with it, but in reality I was VERY dependent on it! I went NOWHERE without it!! I had such severe "panic attacks" that I was petrified to leave home without it. I did not take it every day, but always had it available for when symptoms were worse. Although when my POTS hit full force in 2009 and I could not even raise my head out of bed without my hr going almost to 200 I stayed on it daily.

I found it to be very helpful and the titrating off it was not bad.

blessings from FL

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