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The Emotional Effects Of This


sue1234
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I'm sitting here listening to Carly Simon's song "Haven't got time for the pain" and thinking this is so true. Ever since POTS hit me, I have just tuned out things in life that just don't seem important anymore. You know, the "crazy, busy" stuff that I ran around doing for the first 45 years of my life. Well, of course I can't run around anymore, but even the the stuff you don't have to physically do. I have found a need to keep my life simple and quieter than my old life(literally and figuratively). Things that used to bother me in my "old" life seem so not important anymore. However, I also have new things that bother me that shouldn't--for example, I was at an appt. the other day and they had the tv going in the crowded waiting room. Alot of people talking. That made me very frustrated, and that in turn spills over into physical symptoms. My heart started racing and I felt more lightheaded. It was EONS before they called me back, and I had asked if I could go lie down ANYWHERE in the back, but the receptionist said NO.

I find mentally I can't take too much going on. I feel like shutting down.

Which has made me tell my husband that I might know what it feels like for kids to have autism. And I'm just guessing here. But, from what I've been experiencing to social stimuli, I just feel like shutting down when it gets overwhelming. By withdrawing, it helps quiet the physical symptoms. I was NOT at all like this before.

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I totally understand. I used to be SO quick and lively in social situations. Now I'm looking for a place to sit, and mostly listen to others (which I should have done more in the first place). Also, I find that I've trained myself to not overreact to problems, after having many episodes of worse symptoms when I became emotional. Sometimes it seems like I even have a flat affect (no emotional response), but the energy expended to get upset about something is just too valuable.

And yes, I also get overstimulated, especially when multiple conversations are occurring, there are bright lights, loud noise, or if it's too warm. At those times, I feel like I'm going to be out of control as well.

Keep hanging in there...

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Right there with you. Hang in there. Sometimes a simple life is better anyway. Less to worry about. I too can't take the stimulus or noise or lights etc. etc. I think it's just a part of the autonomic nervous system misfiring and causing too much of a reaction. You know we are all just the yellow canaries in this world - we feel the things that others probably should - only just too much so. We are hyper sensitive and our bodies tell us that on a daily basis.

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So right, Issie. When I finally got diagnosed, my rheumatologist tapped my knee with the little hammer and my leg could have kicked a field goal. He said I have 'central sensitization syndrome', common in dysautonomia. It has happened with other doctors, but he was the only one who made the connection.

I have been overly sensitive my whole life (emotions, food & drug allergies, skin flushing) but now at least I know why. I agree that living a simpler life is better. The body was not made to run continuously 24/7. I am 55 and just now realizing this??? It just proves that an old dog really CAN learn new tricks ;)

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