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How Would A Nuerologist Help?


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My primary doctor sent me to a nuerologist and I have an appointment next week. I was wondering how a nuerologist could really help me with dealing with POTS. Can he prescribe me certain meds that a my primary physician cant? Whats the big difference ??

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I got sent to one this past summer. I wondered the same thing. He did an MRI of my brain/neck area and found some issues with my neck, but didn't do anything about it. He didn't help one iota regarding the POTS, and didn't even offer any med or anything to try. Just another test-performing doctor. He said just come back if I have a problem--uhhh, I thought that's why I went!!! :blink:

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I went to a neurologist about memory issues in addition to my POTS diagnosis. She did a full neuro workup complete with a 72 hour EEG. Turns out I have temporal lobe epilepsy. One of the manifestations of seizures in that area of the brain can be autonomic abnormalities. When I was started on anti-seizure meds my POTS symptoms improved dramatically. My autonomic specialist has started to send some of his POTS patients to my neurologist to see if they also have issues with epilepsy.

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My son's POTS specialist is a neurologist. He was the first one to be able to help my son. The doctor who originally diagnosed my son was a cardiologist, but was not helpful at all. All of the autonomic testing was done by this neurologist, so I have found him to be the most helpful.

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I went to a neurologist when I first read about POTS. He was no help. I had to tell him what POTS was, and then he thought it was just Orthostatic Intolerance. When he heard the Taccycardia part he sent me to a Cardiologist. Who in turn said I should see a Neurologist.. I also had to tell him what POTS was.

I guess the thing is it depends on how much they know about POTS. Since this doctor I saw knew nothing of it and wasn't interested in learning something new, he was no help. If you found a doctor that was familiar with POTS I would think it could be helpful.

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My son's POTS specialist is a neurologist. He was the first one to be able to help my son. The doctor who originally diagnosed my son was a cardiologist, but was not helpful at all. All of the autonomic testing was done by this neurologist, so I have found him to be the most helpful.

Can I ask what kind of tests they did on him?

When I went they did the basic tests. But I know he could have done more. He just wasn't interested and passed me on to the cardiologist.

I was later diagnosed by a CFS specialist in my area. the problem is I can't see him now because he doesn't take me insurance. So right now I'm only going to my GP. She's nice, but not much help for POTS.

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I can add a little. My neurologist, although I am firing him shortly, also has done/ is doing much testing to try to find an underlying cause. He did the usual autonomic testing, LP to check CSF, EEG and is sending me for neuropsych testing to see if my history of concussions/whiplash injuries is factoring in. I hope that if you choose to see a neurologist it is a good experience for you!

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My son's POTS specialist is a neurologist. He was the first one to be able to help my son. The doctor who originally diagnosed my son was a cardiologist, but was not helpful at all. All of the autonomic testing was done by this neurologist, so I have found him to be the most helpful.

Can I ask what kind of tests they did on him?

When I went they did the basic tests. But I know he could have done more. He just wasn't interested and passed me on to the cardiologist.

I was later diagnosed by a CFS specialist in my area. the problem is I can't see him now because he doesn't take me insurance. So right now I'm only going to my GP. She's nice, but not much help for POTS.

My son had the Tilt Table Test, MRI(with and without contrast), Thermoregulartory sweat test, gastric emptying test. Because nausea and abdominal pain were part of my son's symtpoms, they also did an endoscopy, colonoscopy, antroduodenal(sp?) tests. The TTT resulted in a diagnosis of POTS, the TST resulted in a diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy and the gastric emptying test resulted in a diagnosis of gastroparesis.

Christy

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