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DizzyMe

Bending,squatting,lifting.

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I am very affected by bending over from the waist(i.e to pick something up from the floor,load the washing machine).

When I am in a bad patch,which I am at the moment,even bending forward very slightly to brush my teeth,wash face over sink etc triggers bad symptoms.

For a few seconds/minutes or so after bending I feel very short of oxygen and tachy,sometimes extremely lightheaded too.The effect it cumulative if i do more.

This symptom also happens after squatting and lifting my children.

I know that bending is listed under the what to avoid section here but I don't understand the mechanisms that make it so difficult.

It feels as though my heart struggles to keep up with the demands these positions place on it but being new to all things POTS I don't know why.

Does everyone with POTS feel like this? :)

Thanks.

Melanie.

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yes I get this , I have not been diagnosed with pots but orthostatic hypotention,

I dont know why this happens.

I also get it if I look up at something and my heart starts racing - yuck!

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When I bend over it feels like a noose gets pulled tight around my neck, throat feels closed. Lifting is tough the valsalva maneuver gets a lot of us.

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That happens to most of us, especially if you also suffer from blood pooling. Bending, lifting, carrying heavy weights, climbing stairs, or simple over-exertion causes all of the wonderful symptoms. It has to do with improper return blood flow from your lower body to your heart.

For me, whenever I feel the nasties coming on I squat, which instantly pushes or squeezes the trapped blood in my legs back to my heart, which immediately drops my heart rate by 40bpm or more in mere seconds and stops the headaches.

Getting up from a squat is tricky, I straighten my knees but keep my upper body hunched over with my hands on my knees for a minute before straightening up.

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I just wanted to add a "Me too!" and an odd footnote.... I'm well enough that I do a local fitness boot camp several times a week. I always pay close attemtion to what sets off my symptoms so I can avoid it or tread carefully if I decide to try. A maneuver called a "squat thrust" was impossible for me at first. You start in a standing position, squat down (almost to the floor), then, thrust your feet out behind you like you're in push-up position, then return to squat position, and then stand up- Phew! Even writing that exhausted me <_< .

When I first tried this, I felt like I was going to faint after one :rolleyes: . Everything turned black and I got all woozy. I asked my instructor for an alternative move. Over time (9 months now) I've worked up to one, then two, etc. Through the months, I have worked myself up to 15-20 in a row. I still get a little dizzy, but nothing like that first time. I guess my point is, T-R-Y to stretch yourself just a tiny bit. If you have trouble squatting, make a point of squatting at least once a day (while safely holding on to something!) Then try to work up to twice a day. Our bodies have a wonderful ability to adapt if we gently encourage them.

Please follow your physician's advice re. movement limitations. This advice obviously doesn't apply to all here. I just wanted to share my experience. De-conditioning does NOT cause dysautonomia. But safe conditioning in little, tiny baby steps can improve our dysautonomia symptoms.

Julie

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I am very affected by bending over from the waist(i.e to pick something up from the floor,load the washing machine).

When I am in a bad patch,which I am at the moment,even bending forward very slightly to brush my teeth,wash face over sink etc triggers bad symptoms.

For a few seconds/minutes or so after bending I feel very short of oxygen and tachy,sometimes extremely lightheaded too.The effect it cumulative if i do more.

This symptom also happens after squatting and lifting my children.

I know that bending is listed under the what to avoid section here but I don't understand the mechanisms that make it so difficult.

It feels as though my heart struggles to keep up with the demands these positions place on it but being new to all things POTS I don't know why.

Does everyone with POTS feel like this? :rolleyes:

Thanks.

Melanie.

Hi Melanie-

Since this is all new to you, a couple quick ways to adapt your environment might help you.

Step stools are wonderful to keep you from bending all the way down - if you put the laundry basket on one it stops you from bending over that last six inches. When you brush your teeth, put one foot on a step stool - this helps keep some of the blood flowing and helps you to remember to contract your leg muscles. If your children are young enough to pick up, whenever you are out and about, pick up old fashioned small wooden children's desk chairs. These will work for the children and for you - I still use my son's!

Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate - it has been shown that a faint can be put off by chugging a bottle of water. You have to make sure you are drinking a gallon a day and getting your salt and electrolytes.

I naturally used the squat as a preventative and probably put off getting diagnosised. You might actually have to work on your technique - strange as that might sound. Don't bend your head forward as you bend your legs - keep your back straight as you go down. If that doesn;t ring true or make sense to you ignore it.

Remember to conserve some energy for yourself. Post any more questions or concerns, this group is great and always willing to try and help.

Best of luck,

Noreen

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Many thanks for your responses and helpful suggestions.I will definatly look at ways to adjust what I am doing and the baby steps forward is what I need to remind myself of, its great to hear of your achievements at boot camp by doing that.

Melanie.

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Many thanks for your responses and helpful suggestions.I will definatly look at ways to adjust what I am doing and the baby steps forward is what I need to remind myself of, its great to hear of your achievements at boot camp by doing that.

Melanie.

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