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Ansiscope? Measures The Activities Of The Parasympathetic And Sympathetic Systems


ana13sanchez
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Autonomic dysfunction (or dysautonomia)

What is it?

Autonomic dysfunction (or dysautonomia) is defined as a disorder of the autonomic nervous system which is due to abnormalities of one or both of its sub-systems.

The ANS controls the heart rate and many other vital functions. A disorder of such a system may be silent and can cause sudden death if not detected early.

In the case of diabetes, dysautonomia is due to damage of the nerve fibers of the autonomic system caused by glucose.

How does the ANSiscope reflect this?

Since the ANSiscope measures the activities of the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems with every new heart beat, it further becomes possible to integrate the way these two systems function together, how well they interact. Based on the measurement of these activities, the ANSiscope offers a specific measurement of autonomic dysfunction.

How is the measurement made?

The patient is required to be in a supine position (i.e. to lie down) and at rest (i.e. without any external stimulation). The ECG electrodes are connected to the body and readings for 500 heart beats are taken, representing around 5 to 10 minutes. At the end of it the ANSiscope displays two pieces of information.

1. A percentage of autonomic dysfunction

2. A classification of the patient according to the percentage of dysfunction

Because the ANSiscope is able to make this measurement, it is an excellent tool for the prevention of the complications of diabetes.

Many endocrinologists have said that it is possible to treat this condition if it is detected early enough.

The American Diabetes Association recommended (as far back as 1988) that ANS testing be done on at least a yearly basis when diabetes was detected. However, no measurement device was available to allow this to be done simply and elegantly, no ANS testing existed prior to the measurement capability of the ANSiscope. Some MDs previously proposed a sequence of cumbersome maneuvers (such as the Valsalva, the Tilt Test, or Respiratory Sinus Arrythmia) which require too much time, full participation of patients and subsequent analysis, for being able to test this dysfunction. In fact this autonomic scoring is nor accurate, nor reproducible. No measurement device was available until now to allow this classification and detection to be done simply, elegantly and quickly.

How does it make the measurement?

We define autonomic dysfunction as a lack of coupling between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic systems measured by our two ANSindices . A mathematical evaluation of this lack of coupling provides the two indicators of autonomic dysfunction, namely the level of the dysfunction and the degree of autonomic neuropathy.

Some preliminary results presented at various conferences (available on this web site) show that the dysautonomia measurement of the ANSiscope is able to order the patients in very clear groups according to their levels of dysfunction. Furthermore, these groups stay stable under changes in the observation window and do not overlap, so that it is only necessary to have a 5-10 minutes measurement under supine conditions.

The measurement is thus highly accurate and stable, providing excellent repeatability. Doctors are now able to chart the course of DAN in their patients and can very quickly determine whether this particular complication of diabetes is stable, progressing or regressing.

How can it make a difference ?

Accurate measurement is at the core of prevention. Treatments can now be adapted to the condition and neuropathy stage of the patient, knowing what to do, when to start and through measure one can further assess how to dose and when to stop the treatment. Drugs acting at the sole level of nerve damage could reverse functional disorders of the ANS, stage which is known only through the ANSiscope?s instrumental measurement.

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Hmmmm. This might be the test results that Dadof2 just did & posted for us all to see. Very interesting. I wonder where you can have the test done & what implications it has for tweaking treatment?

I notice that Ana speaks primarily of diabetes as a causitive factor for autonomic dysfunction. Very few of us here have that as a root cause. We have connective tissue disorders, MCAD, post-viral onset, etc. Wonder if the testing is still accurate for us. I find it hard to believe that it only takes 5-10 mins lying down to get a DX. I would guess that my HR looks pretty normal lying down. When I stand up- different story.

I'd love to learn more. Anybody?

Julie

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Hmmmm. This might be the test results that Dadof2 just did & posted for us all to see. Very interesting. I wonder where you can have the test done & what implications it has for tweaking treatment?

I notice that Ana speaks primarily of diabetes as a causitive factor for autonomic dysfunction. Very few of us here have that as a root cause. We have connective tissue disorders, MCAD, post-viral onset, etc. Wonder if the testing is still accurate for us. I find it hard to believe that it only takes 5-10 mins lying down to get a DX. I would guess that my HR looks pretty normal lying down. When I stand up- different story.

I'd love to learn more. Anybody?

Julie

This sounds very much like the Heart Rate Variability testing I had done by the nutritionist guy I saw. It was the first real "proof" that something was not right with my ANS. It measures your heart rate for about 500 beats split between lying down and then standing up. My test showed that my parasympathetic system was not regulating properly, especially when I stood up. My doctor said he had never heard of this and gave me that look like is this for real? I know for a fact that they use this same type of testing at one of the Mayo clinics cause it was on the story someone posted of a teenage girl who kept passing out all the time and all the stuff the went through to get a DX of NMH. Some of you might remember that post some time back! Anyway, I would love to hear others who have had the HRV test done and know if they too had a detection of a ANS in dysfunction.

Have a good weekend everyone!

KC

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"This sounds very much like the Heart Rate Variability testing I had done by the nutritionist guy I saw. It was the first real "proof" that something was not right with my ANS. It measures your heart rate for about 500 beats split between lying down and then standing up. My test showed that my parasympathetic system was not regulating properly, especially when I stood up. My doctor said he had never heard of this and gave me that look like is this for real? I know for a fact that they use this same type of testing at one of the Mayo clinics cause it was on the story someone posted of a teenage girl who kept passing out all the time and all the stuff the went through to get a DX of NMH. Some of you might remember that post some time back! Anyway, I would love to hear others who have had the HRV test done and know if they too had a detection of a ANS in dysfunction."

Wow, KC, a nutritionist did this for you? Who, where? Does he have a brother in GA?

In Ana's post, she mentioned that the testing was ONLY done lying down. THAT"S why I question how or if it works. I want to learn more too!

Thanks-

Julie

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This does sound interesting and I would like to hear more too.

Based on my experience, it sounds like whatever this is that it has some similar concepts to some of the testing Vanderbilt does. I'm referring to the test where you lay down and they do the various activities....hyperventilating, hand grip, hand in ice while they measure the response of BP and heart rate. I believe they are measuring the same things as this poster is referring to just in a different manner.

It doesn't sound like the test described by ana would be as informative for most folks on here because most of us on this site don't deal with diabetes as our cause.

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This sounds very much like the Heart Rate Variability testing I had done by the nutritionist guy I saw. It was the first real "proof" that something was not right with my ANS. It measures your heart rate for about 500 beats split between lying down and then standing up. My test showed that my parasympathetic system was not regulating properly, especially when I stood up. My doctor said he had never heard of this and gave me that look like is this for real? I know for a fact that they use this same type of testing at one of the Mayo clinics cause it was on the story someone posted of a teenage girl who kept passing out all the time and all the stuff the went through to get a DX of NMH. Some of you might remember that post some time back! Anyway, I would love to hear others who have had the HRV test done and know if they too had a detection of a ANS in dysfunction.

Have a good weekend everyone!

KC

Can you give me this nutritionist's name? I'm in Oregon as well. Thank you!

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This sounds very much like the Heart Rate Variability testing I had done by the nutritionist guy I saw. It was the first real "proof" that something was not right with my ANS. It measures your heart rate for about 500 beats split between lying down and then standing up. My test showed that my parasympathetic system was not regulating properly, especially when I stood up. My doctor said he had never heard of this and gave me that look like is this for real? I know for a fact that they use this same type of testing at one of the Mayo clinics cause it was on the story someone posted of a teenage girl who kept passing out all the time and all the stuff the went through to get a DX of NMH. Some of you might remember that post some time back! Anyway, I would love to hear others who have had the HRV test done and know if they too had a detection of a ANS in dysfunction.

Have a good weekend everyone!

KC

Can you give me this nutritionist's name? I'm in Oregon as well. Thank you!

Well Hi fellow Oregonian! You live real close to me in fact! The guys name is Jens Riogeist. His office is called Riverspirt Wellness Center. His number is 503-538-5128. He also does the autonomic muscle testing to see what the body is saying is wrong. It's very different but I was shocked at what he found on me. Check it out and feel free to message me if you need more info! I believe the initial testing cost around $100.00.

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"This sounds very much like the Heart Rate Variability testing I had done by the nutritionist guy I saw. It was the first real "proof" that something was not right with my ANS. It measures your heart rate for about 500 beats split between lying down and then standing up. My test showed that my parasympathetic system was not regulating properly, especially when I stood up. My doctor said he had never heard of this and gave me that look like is this for real? I know for a fact that they use this same type of testing at one of the Mayo clinics cause it was on the story someone posted of a teenage girl who kept passing out all the time and all the stuff the went through to get a DX of NMH. Some of you might remember that post some time back! Anyway, I would love to hear others who have had the HRV test done and know if they too had a detection of a ANS in dysfunction."

Wow, KC, a nutritionist did this for you? Who, where? Does he have a brother in GA?

In Ana's post, she mentioned that the testing was ONLY done lying down. THAT"S why I question how or if it works. I want to learn more too!

Thanks-

Julie

Hi Julie! I was just going to tell you that I have heard that a lot of alternative medical people are turning to this HRV testing. I know of a chiropractor who uses it and I've heard of a few naturpathic docs using it so I would look around in your area and see if anyone is offering it. Try searching it and see if anything comes up. Worth a shot!

Good luck!

KC

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