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Dysautonomia Centers???


MamaTrain
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Au contraire, there is an element of depression, as in neurochemical imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurochemistry that affects not just the brain, but the secretory organs of the body, too.

That chemistry discussion has to wait a bit, yet.

How about a little history?

The History of Dysautonomia

http://www.cvm.missouri.edu/neurology/Dysauton/history.htm

http://www.dynakids.org/why_i_never_heard.jsp

Timeline of Dysautonomia:

http://www.google.com/#q=history+of+dysaut...03f3b2a1b734003

NOTE THE DATES. Far down the road, we will come back to the importance of these dates - it will be one of the last pieces of this complex puzzle to be laid out.

Dysautonomia medical description and case prevalance suggests that is a relatively modern family of abnormal neurological and metabolic states, like type II diabetes.

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This latter case, where patients report and physicians observe symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia during a GTT, but the blood work fails to show significant deviation from normal blood glucose rise and fall, is why many inexpert physicians will say..."I don't believe in hypoglycemia".

In other words, they don't know what's going on, and in the absence of testing for epinephrine surge, they write it off as psychosomatic, or anxiety disorder.

Right, well in my case the dr did not say it was psychosomatic or anxiety disorder. He said it was abnormal epinephrine response, as you note. This was b/c at that point I had been diagnosed with POTS.

I guess the question is how to manage the symptoms best. In my case, eating as if I am hypoglycemic helps.

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Au contraire, there is an element of depression, as in neurochemical imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurochemistry that affects not just the brain, but the secretory organs of the body, too.

That chemistry discussion has to wait a bit, yet.

How about a little history?

The History of Dysautonomia

http://www.cvm.missouri.edu/neurology/Dysauton/history.htm

http://www.dynakids.org/why_i_never_heard.jsp

Timeline of Dysautonomia:

http://www.google.com/#q=history+of+dysaut...03f3b2a1b734003

NOTE THE DATES. Far down the road, we will come back to the importance of these dates - it will be one of the last pieces of this complex puzzle to be laid out.

Dysautonomia medical description and case prevalance suggests that is a relatively modern family of abnormal neurological and metabolic states, like type II diabetes.

Hmmm. Why do I feel as if Dr. Gregory House has just hobbled into the room & joined the discussion? :lol: All I can say is: WHAT TOOK YOU SO LONG? I'm still looking forward ("far down the road") to the dots being connected. Hope it helps us all!

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Timeline of Dysautonomia:

http://www.google.com/#q=history+of+dysaut...03f3b2a1b734003

NOTE THE DATES. Far down the road, we will come back to the importance of these dates - it will be one of the last pieces of this complex puzzle to be laid out.

Dysautonomia medical description and case prevalance suggests that is a relatively modern family of abnormal neurological and metabolic states, like type II diabetes.

The timeline link is nonsensical. Explain?

I don't know that it is modern condition. I suspect it just hasn't been recognized until recently. Although as was noted in the article at the beginning of the thread, it had different names in the past. Perhaps due to environmental factors it is more prevalent than it used to be, but I don't think there is any data to answer this one way or the other. And not sure how helpful it would be to know.

I look forward to your answers. Not sure what you mean by "far down the road", etc. Why not lay out your ideas now?

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I just spent about ten minutes on PubMed and here is the timeline that I have compiled:

DaCosta?s syndrome/Effort syndrome/Soldier?s heart/Irritable heart1871-

Neurocirculatory asthenia 1927

Postural Hypotension 1948

Orthostatic Tachycardia/Orthostatic intolerance 1948

Dysautonomia/familial dysautonomia 1954

Autonomic imbalance 1964

Mitral Valve Prolapse syndrome 1966

POTS 1999

These are all former names for what we now group together as "dysautonomias." All of these would now be sub-classified, but ALL present with orthostatic intolerance, fatigue, syncope or near syncope, and brainfog. DaCosta makes note of previous medical mention of similar conditions of British soldiers several decades before his article. MOST of the time, it was chalked up to deconditioning or malingering...unless it was a woman: then it was "obvious neurosis." Migraine is NOW classified as a transient dysautonomia and it has been around since pharoh ruled Egypt!

Put your points out there, we are all pretty good at connecting dots. .. ... .... ..... ......._________________!

If you have successfully managed your symptoms, please elucidate us to your remedy! I like puzzles and I'd love to see the whole picture on your pieces! Every mind working on this is one more step towards a greater understanding of this/these condition(s).

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Here is the same Google timeline for Migraine:

Google's Migraine timeline

It really doesn't show up much till the 1600's then it explodes exponentially.....just like dysautonomia! I think the awareness and interest in MEDICINE as a science instead of herbology or shamanism is what you are seeing. Remember, doctors didn't deliver babies until about 100 years ago, and most people went to healers/wise-women/herbalists for healing...or they just died!

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Yes ANS controls hr, digestion, breathing but not every involuntary bodily function

Sorry; now I'm confused; the ANS doesn't control all involuntary (automatic or unconscious) functions? Sometimes reading I may miss something until I read it 4 or 5 times, so I'm going to go back and read again :)

How do I find out what it doesn't control?

I wonder if you can start out with a somewhat compromised nervous system
I'm wondering that also, since I remember having problems around age 9.

I'm trying to find the article I had about govt research and exercise connection. If my memory serves me [dont quote me lol] they said there was no reason to do a widespread study on how lack of exercise affected patients, all you had to do was look at history when women were kept in bed for this condition. Some of these women died, while many others recovered. No one understood where the problems came from.

Is there research other than listed here about enzymes, being done of cures, what works & what doesn't?

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I was recently diagnosed with NCS & OI so far (along with several cardiac related problems) who knows how long I've had this, but I suspect since I was 9.

Until I went to a cardiologist in July, other doctors have told me fainting & other problems were no big deal, so I believed them. She sent me to an EP for an EPS and ablation and he said I needed a TTT; which confirmed NCS & OI.

Im still trying to find a connection to the body pains, twinges etc sometimes stabbing sometimes feels like something crawling in different place, kind of numb but then sometimes tremors like charlie horses but worse...my husband can massage my legs with his palms, but to touch even lightly with a fingertip is excruicating - it started on other places of my body this past week.

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