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POTS and Miscarriages


Guest Mary from OH
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Guest Mary from OH

I had 3 miscarriages before I was able to give birth to my daughter, Marissa. I ended up going to an infertility clinic. It was very strange. I am able to get pregnant VERY easily, but my body has a very difficult time sustaining the pregnancy. The dr was not really able to figure out why. He started me on progesterone injections. I only had ONE injection and had the WORST migraine in my whole life. I thought I was going to die. I was wondering if anyone else had difficult carrying a pregnancy with POTS or it is just my crazy body. I could not find anything in the research. Thank you. I would really like to have another child at some point, but I'm terrified. I do not think I could sustain the loss of yet another child. Plus, my daughter has so many medical problems....

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miscarriages are extremely common. more than 85% of women have at least one. i don't believe your problem is related to pots. there are just some women that for whatever reason, the uterus is just not pregnant friendly. if you have 3 or more of them you are considered high risk. but there are very healthy womwn out there who have the same problem. depending on how far along you get, it can be anything from incompetent cervix to hormonal imbalances to a genetic problem. good luck to you. i know some of the things they do to save a pregnancy are not fun, they do prove to be helpful quite often. just as an added note, THIS IS IN NO WAY TO BE CONSTRUED AS POLITICAL, women who have had abortions can be damaged along the lining of the uterus and develop a condition that makes it impossible to carry a baby. you do not sound like this at all since you are trying to have babies, but for anyone who's had one and is now trying to concieve, it's important that you be very honest with your doctor, especially if you are having problems. many women came to our office and didn't want to tell us about it. it is not our job to judge, but it is an essential diagnostic tool for people having problems. morgan

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The problem morgan describes is sometimes (often?) simply scar tissue, an "adhesion" that depending on where the egg implants, can affect its growth. Adhesions can be diagnosed with an HSG test (which also diagnoses other problems with blocked tubes and more) and then removed in a fairly quick and simple surgical procedure.

BTW, I asked the same questions you have asked, several times and in several ways and in front of several different kinds of specialists... and I was told by everyone that no, people w/POTS are not at greater risk than the general population for miscarriages etc. PHEW!

I have never been told by a physician, however, that pots = "autoimmune" (in fact, I think it is not) although it's quite possible that folks with other health issues can also have pots. Hope that makes sense!

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I would like to note that although miscarriages are common in the general population, they are even more common in women with underlying disorders that often are autoimmune in nature -- i.e., lupus, scleroderma. If you have had more than one miscarriage, a perinatologist consult (high-risk pregnancy doctor) is probably in order. There are several tests that can be run to determine a possible cause.

I was tested for these problems not because I had a miscarriage, but because my daughter suffered growth restriction partially due to an underlying thrombophilia (clotting disorder).

Amy

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Guest Mary from OH

I did see a specialist and yes I am considered to be high-risk. My pregnancy with my daughter was also considered to be high-risk as well (my fever - previously dx as FUO which now I know is POTS related).

There were no significant findings as to why I was miscarrying. Yes, miscarriages are common, but 3 miscarriages is NOT common.

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Mary, I should have said this earlier in my other post but I'll say it now--I'm very sorry for your losses. I know firsthand how agonizing this can be.

I have a friend (who does not have POTS, and who does not have another diagnosed health problem) who had 2 miscarriages, then a healthy pregancy, then 3 miscarriages, then a healthy pregnancy. Needless to say, five miscarriages were tough on her and her family--but today she does have two great bio kids! She suffered a lot of loss and grieved deeply each time; she knew that she ran a risk each time she became pregnant, knowing what might happen.

I just thought I'd share that story... I wish you well on your journey.

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