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Hello all Y'all across the pond! :(

I have the opportunity to go to Paris and London this summer when my husband flies over for work. I would love to go, but we are both concerned about my sight-seeing tolerance. I definitely cannot walk much longer than 20 minutes. Are most of the museums wheelchair accessible or have seating? If get to go, what MUST I see there? Is Stonehenge or Versailles out of the question? Are the "biking" tours as slow and easy as my husband seems to think they are? (I might be able to do that.) Are there any places to absolutely avoid because of long lines?

We attempted Yellowstone National Park last year because we thought we could drive to most of the sites and take short walks to them. We were wrong, plus the altitude and terrain did not help...steep hills, sulfur fumes and thin air are not good for the ANS! The kids want to go to Washington D.C. to the Smithsonian, but I think that would kill me! :blink:

Thanks!

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Firewatcher, I really hope you can go! I bought a seat-cane a few months ago and won't travel without it. Even if I'm up to walking the distance, it's like my security blanket in case I have to stop and stand (like in airport security). It's lightweight and also gives me something to lean on if I get tired while walking.

And obviously, stay extra hydrated on those long flights!

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Hi firewatcher, it can get very hot in europe in summer and the airconditioning is not as common as in the US. So please take one of them hand ventilators (Wich spray water as well) with you. You can use it whenever you get to hot, its a great thing, i always have it with me.

A seat cane is a great help as well. In case of long lines i always find a cool place to sit and let my partner stand in line, he calles me whenever its time for me to join him. I go most places if its not too hot and with my mini ventilator and lots of drinks i can manage ok. I sit down whenever i need to. On the floor or every other place.

All the best for you

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I went to Scotland last Sept to meet with my daughter. I was worried. Always keep water with you. You will need to rest more just plan that into your day. Most important for me was to eat well. It really helped. Do your exercises for muscle tone., as I said can be done on floor. Pack layers. I did and do get a headache after a trip like that, so I made no plans for the first day just acclimate. Salt tabs in purse. And make sure you have a note from pcp about IV's if you need them. Its sssocialized medicine there. You can get the IV's with a note and Dr. #. Cheers M

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I've been to Europe with POTS a couple of times, and actually lived in Paris last summer. If you haven't been, it is amazing and I would definitely go for it. It's not as user friendly as the US - buildings and facilities are older. There aren't as many escalators, elevators, etc. and often they are lableled handicapped only. People may look at you strange for using them, or even get mad at you, but I would just use them anyway. I am not in a wheelchair, and I used them. My best advice is just to carry around what you need - water, etc., be prepared for the unexpected and take things at a leisurely pace. Running around all over town doesn't work with well with POTS. I would avoid the subways and take cabs to get around, or public buses. Enjoy!

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London is a great city and there is lots to see. You'll have to get a Lonely Planet or other guide to narrow down your choices. If you have any questions, feel free to PM. I don't live in London (live about 90 minutes away), but have been there a lot of times.

The sites of London are spread over quite a big area, so normally people use the underground and walk which obviously can be tiring, but the walking distances aren't too far (normally less than 500m) from the underground stations. Warning - the underground is extremely hot in summer! You could get taxis if the distances are longer than you wanted to walk.

Accessibility should be fine. I'm trying to think where would have queues. The London Eye is one - there is always a scarily long queue, but actually it moves quite quickly (but still bank on >30 mins). The houses of parliament are open for tours in the summer, which is very interesting, but not a lot of seating around. Other than that, it will be busy, but museums and galleries tend to have plenty of seats if you need a rest.

Stonehenge is a long way from London (100 miles and not a great journey).

Paris is a lovely city too and is very different from London. Again the tourist sites are spread out, getting around is usually by underground and walking, though you are likely to need to walk further from the underground station to get to the sights. Expect to queue at the Eiffel tower (go early in the day) and the Louvre.

Versailles is doable from Paris (10 miles) and there are plenty of coach trips to get you there.

I would take the opportunity to see both cities. It will be tiring, but will be worth it.

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Most public buildings in the UK are wheelchair accessible especially museums. Are you bringing a wheelchair with you or hiring one? The London Underground (tube) can be difficult as most of the stations have escalators and stairs rather than elevators, but if you can fold the chair up and walk you can take it on the escalators with you. (my wheelchair doesn't fold so I can't take it on the tube). London Taxis are the traditional UK "black cab" style and I think that all of them can take wheelchairs. A lot of buses can take wheelchairs too so getting about isn't too much of a problem.

Where to visit - it depends on what sort of things you would like to see. Personally I love the natural history museum. A few years ago I was invited for dinner on a boat on the Thames - travelling by boat gave wonderful views of the Houses of Parliament.

Flop

(I don't live in or even near London but I do travel there for hospital appointments and charity events).

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WHen i travel overseas with POTS it goes like this:

I fly somewhere, i get a pots surge for an hour the next day upon arrival then my POTS symptoms nearly disappear. Then i fly home and the day after the flight my POTS comes back worse than ever. I have no idea why.

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