Jump to content

What Will My Stress Test Show?


bizbiz

Recommended Posts

I have had two stress tests ... both BEFORE I was diagnosed with POTS and both showed that I was in perfect health ... FOR AN 80 YEAR OLD! I couldn't stay on the tread mill for more than a couple minutes before they had to come and grab me off of there.

All they got out of the test was that I seemed to be "in very poor condition" for my age. They had no idea of course that it was the orthostatic intollerance.

Doesn't seem much point in doing one now. On the other hand something like a Holter monitor can show how your heart is handling even your every day "stress tests".

Link to post
Share on other sites

all my stress tests are normal (with trace tricuspid regurgitation)--I've had at least 3 or 4 done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a stress test about three years ago. I am very orthostatic, therefore, in the preliminary exams I lost a readable blood pressure upon standing up. Nevertheless, I was determined to attempt the test since I was there. Ofcourse, every reading on the treadmill was a "non-reading" as my blood pressure could not be measured. For that reason, it was determined that I "failed" the test. It was also considered "equivical" since I only lasted four minutes. I had readings during the test that showed a slight variation that was questionable as well. My family doctor recommended further testing due to other factors, however, my autonomic specialist was not alarmed by my decision to forgo further testing.

I must say, however, that at this point I wish I had gone for the further testing. It would have been nice to have ruled out cardiovascular disease. However, the test, in and of itself, was worthwhile because I can point to it as evidence of my disability. Few people, including medical professionals, fully understand tilt table testing. They are, however, familiar with "stress testing". When I say that I lost my blood pressure as soon as I stepped on the treadmill, well, for whatever reason, this is something that they understand.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I was treated for ans issues, I also would drop my bp, and this would freak people out. I dropped my bp from 110/60 to 72/38 while exercising and this led to a flurry of invasive tests. Not saying this will happen to you. Some POTs people can do a treadmill test no problem, with a normal result. In fact, I had a normal treadmill test several months ago, but AFTER geting proper treatment.

I had a chemical stress test (adenosine and thallium) that was abnormal--probably not pots-related, just because my breast tissue interfered with the signal and made it seem like my heart was not getting enough blood. I eventually had to have a heart cateterization as a follow up. I other words, sometimes tests lead to more tests.

But it is quite possible your test will be completely normal. And if it's not, it can also be a red herring, because no test is perfect. And our ans issues can sometimes make our pressures and rates look abnormal, I agree that event recorders, holter monitors are also good for us to see what's going on throughout the day. The main thing is to have doctors who are knowledgeable enough about ans issues that they know we don't always look like other people and that weird results for us can have different interpretations than the standard cardiac patient.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My cardiac stress test showed a fast rise in HR with a normal widening of pulse pressure (systolic BP-diastolic BP) and was stopped when my HR hit 180 in less than 7 minutes. My husband (who does not exercise regularly and is 30-40 pounds overweight) never got above 145 and went the full length of the test.

I was told that I had "fair" exercise tolerance and an "excessive response" in HR to the level of exercise. The echo-cardiogram part of the test showed "hyperdynamic wall motion" meaning that the heart is beating HARD!

If you can, ask them to take a note of your supine HR when they start the EKG, then stand up and ask again. Mine went from 60's to over 100 bpm in less than 30 seconds so that when I started the test, it was already high. I wish they had to continued to monitor my BP once I got off, that is when I get my "crashes" the systolic tanks and I get REALLY narrow pulse pressure (dizzy, grey-outs, confusion, etc.)

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!GET COPIES OF THE RESULTS for your OWN records!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an exercise stress test done several years ago (before I got really symptomatic). I was tachycardic before the test started at about 110, I was actually quite fit and managed 16 minutes of a full bruce protocol (running fast uphill). For the last 2 minutes of the test my HR was over 200/min and I think got as high as 218/min. I don't know what my BP was during the test. My test was done to see if exercise provoked any cardiac arrhythmias as other tests had shown a risk that my palpitations may be due to ventricular tachycardia.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thankyou everyone for your replies.

Flop - did the tests expose any arrhythmias? Also, what is the difference between the tachycardia that I experience daily and ventricular tachycardia? I have never had a stress test done or worn a 24hr holter monitor, but I'm thinking of seeing my doctor and pushing him to organise these for me 1) just to see what my heart is up to during the day and during my daily 35 minute power walk (and to see how it responds / copes with exercise), and 2) because I seem to be getting a lot more palps during my walk. These palps just feel like a very sudden, hard, loud beat (not sure if they are normal or not).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...